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Full text of "Constitution and playing rules of the National league of professional base ball clubs"

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SPALDIING ATHLETIC LIBRARY 

Giving the Titles ol all Spalding Athletic Library i 
Boohs now in print, grouped tor ready reference ' 



=Oo<?= 



No. 


1 


No. 


2 


No. 


2, 


No. 


3 


No. 


4 


No. 


5 


No. 





No. 


7 


No. 


8 


No. 


9 


No. 


IO 


No. 


12 



SPALDING OFFICIAL ANNUALS 

Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide 
Spalding's Official Foot Ball Guide 
2a Spalding's Official Association Foot Ball Guide 
Spalding's Official Cricket Guide 
Spalding's Official Lawn Tennis Annual 
Spalding's Official Golf Guide 
Spalding's Official Ice Hockey Guide 
Spalding's Official Basket Ball Guide 
Spalding's Official Bowling Guide 
Spalding's Official Indoor Base Ball Guide 
Spalding's Official Roller Polo Guide 
Spalding's Official Athletic Almanac 



Group I. Base Ball 

,\"o. l Spalding'* I w Ball 

No, 202 How to Play Base Hail. 
No. 223 How to 1 
No. 232 Bfcw to Etna liases. 
No. 230 How to Pitch. 

No. 226 

No. 227 H<»w to Play Third l 

top. 
:t How to Play the Outfield, 

Ho ■;•■-<• ■ Ba • 

Club. [!-• 

How bo < Jr^ar j i;'.«- a Ha. 8 Ball 

Ball Club. 

II'. 

Ilnw t«» Captain a 
How toUmpin [Team, 

■ 
No. 219 oner oi B 

K BALL Ai'Xll.I w:\VS 
No. 2ill Minor I 
No. 293 Official Handboo 

' Ready i n May. 



croup IK root Bail 

I>'<»A Ball 
< in • 
How to Play Foot Ball. 

FOOT BALL AUXILIARIES 

Official Canadian 

I rfficial Lntercolles 

Linn . 

Group III. crlchel 

Guidt .' 

I H'» w to Play It. 

Group IV. Lawn Tennis 

Ni». I Si»tl<! i, 

A u a, mi . 
. How to ri 

Haw a 
mia, 

Group V. coll 

16 HOW tO Play Goll 

Group VI. Hockey 

Field Hocl [0 

H' XH.IARY 

No. 256 Official II t ario 



Any of the Above Books Mailed Postpaid Upon 
Receipt of IO Cents 






^ \SPALDING ATHLETIC LIBRARY /J * 



Al II I. 

rw>k. 

Bffae 



Group VII. Basket Ball 

Group viii. Bowllmj M 

xt a 

Group i\. indoor Base Ball 



Group XIII. 



pantry 
AlllfcllC 

Accomplishments 






Group X. 
Group XI. 



Polo 






Group XIV. Manlii Sporls 



Miscellaneous Games 



Group XII. 















Group XV. Gymnastics 



Athletics 












Group xvi. H jrttt l culture 

i 

■ 



Any 



Books Mailed Postpaid Upon 
t of IO Cents 



^SPALDING ATHLETIC LIBRARY/ /^ 
Group I. Base Ball 





No. I— Np } . Minus Official 

Base Hail Guide. 

annual "i' m 
and 

..] thf .' 
1 1 

big; pictur 

minor 

■>n in all i 
■ 

Ball, and o gival deal 
luformal Ion, t J ri< e LO 

No. 202— Ho^i <o Play Base 

Hall. 

EkUte i r. H. 

Vfuroune 

.• -I i 1 i i« it 

I "Mien 

Iit; how I" l-ilit the 

JauieB i.. Still! 

lii.u i.. be 

how to tier; how 

. 

on. I base; ho* to pin} thi 

bow t" plaj 

i 
by Job 

lion to manage h U 

game; l>a*e i-nN rule* Interpri 

No. 228— Hon to Bat. 

T b ■ tiportanl 

I | I .all plaj I- 

ud baa 

I 

1 

ami the 





No. 2.'t2— How <o Ituii flic 

Ha - 

I 

I 

year. I 

lllg ni 

, I | -h Ilea 

• 

runners 
u Itb< 

■• hen to run ami u ben 

how ami 

■ 

No. 280— Hoti to Pitch. 

•u who 

-.11.. \\ ] 

edge of I heir an \|l 

No. 229— Hon to Cafofeu 

L 
! 

I h i 





^ySPALDING ATHLETIC LIBRARY/^ 3 



No. 225— HOVI to IMn> I i •- - C \o. 

Base. nIoi». 

. nthcT position in a 

ball team 

siicii a change for the 

first base. Modifications 
in line with the better- 

of the B] 
every department have 

made .-it \>: 
hui In no <»i]i».|- <i- 
rnent have they l>een bo radical No 
boy who playa ih.> inhi.-tl m 
to overlook ihe poll 

n i his I k. En- 
tirely new and op to date. Ilins 

Ith full page pictun 
the promlni - Price 

|o (fiit.s. 



V 




II«mv to IMn> Sliort- 

Shoii ot the 

Ltioni "it th«- 
infield to nil. and 
though 1 and quick action 
arc tieci i play- 

er who expects to make 
b Bhortato] 

everj well- 
known player who eov- 
iins position have 

been longfcl In aplllng this b< 

illustrated. Price i" • 




to Piny the 



\o. 226— Hoiv to I'lay Second 
Hon. . 
There an* bo few mi □ 

base to perfection iimt 

their i easily 

tied off by anyone 

the game <>r 

hi. Team owner* 

who \> 

would no1 pari with 

( ln-ni for of 

book for ■ I benefit 

• • 

• this p.- hit "f the 
diamond. niiiHtmt«-d with full-page 
plctui 



No. 827— Hon to Pliiy Third 

Base. 

Third 

Impor- 
Infield. No 

m unaut \\ Itb- 

DUl .i great third base- 

"f rut 
men ti 




;:.. 




\o. WI-H»H 
Oiittlehl. 

romp iHy f (, i 

: Hh. 

would become :iii < 

play- 
ing the Otttlleld Hint h;is 

I II pill 

.-i at man] 
to be learned, be 

hi be :i 

rtenl fleldi 
are in any othei 
mill tins | tins 

ID CI HIS. 

i::i-l)(iu to (iinrli; Bow 
► 4 up tn in it 1 i- si in; llovi 

to Manage a Tea mi How 
to t ntpirei iio« to <»•■- 
uitui/i 1 n Leajguet Tech- 
nical Terms of Hose Hull. 
. fui guide 

t in the 

.1 iuniiy 

fullltlfl 

i'. nbergiT 
naging; 1' 
■ ■ 

ampir- 

leagui 11. fcfur- 

. lenl "f ti land 

gue. 

Technical Terma <if 

nf llll 

\o. 'ji!i-i{i:ni> Reckoner of 
Hioc Hall Percemtasre*. 





MIP 



m* 



mm 



^SPALDING ATHLETIC LIBRARY/7^ 





h\si<: HAM, Al XII. I ARIES. 

Rfo. 2UI — Minor League Unite 
Ball Guide. 

The mini. rs own guide. 
Contains picture 
leading teams, schedules, 
report of annual meeting 
itjon of 
Professional Base Ball 
■ s, special articles 
«ini official rules. Edited 
by President T. H, Mwv 
Dane, of the New England ; 
l-ric* 10 cents, (Beady May 1. 1 

No. 893— Official Handbook 
of ill** National League 
of Professional Bane Hall 

,,M!H - Contains the Constitu- 
tion, By-Laws, Official 
Rules, Averages, and 

| s e h '• tl it l e "i" the Na 
tlonal League for the 
current year, together 
with list of Hub offi- 
cers itiul reports of the 
annual meet Ings of the 
i.i ague. Even follow er 
nf the game should have a copy of 
this book If he wants to keep his 
ale oi Base Ball books complete. 
Trice In rents. 



Group II. Foot Ball 

WO. 2— Spaldinsr'et Official 
Foot Hall Guide. 
Edited by W a 1 1 e < 
Camp Contains tin* new 
rules, with diagram of 
Held; All America teams 
cted by the lead 
Ing authorities; reviews 
of the game from ear! 
..us sections "f the coun- 
try; 1808 scores of all 
the leading teams; pic 
tures of hundreds of play. -rs. Price 
10 c< n 

No. 284— How to Flajr Pool 
Hall. 

Edited by W site r 
I Camp. The contents em 
I . i hing that a 

1 beginner wants to know 
] n ml many points thai an 
.expert will be g 
I learn. The pietn 
I made from suapsl 
I leading teams and play- 
m 9 wiili com- 
Walter Camp. Price 10 







No. 2 A— SpnMinu's Official 
AsMM'iaiidii Soccer Pool 

Hall (.uiilr. 



a complete and up-to- 
■ ii i .i e t o t b e 
game In the 
United States, containing 
Instruct Ions Tor plaj tng 
ihr game, official rules, 
and Interesting a e w a 

Of I he 

country. Illustrated. 

Price n» cents. 



\o. 2mJ-1Iimv to Play Soc- 
cer. 

Owing to tin- great 
Interest shown in 

V" 1 "" 5 1 ball in Anier 

[ca. tin- publishers have 
book compiled in 
hngland, the home of the 
sport, telling how 
position should be played 
written by the t»est play- 
in England in his re- 
spective position, and Illustrated 
with full-page photographs of play- 
ers in action, As u text-book of 
•■ this work is invaluable, 
and no player can afford 

to he without ii. price to cents 



foot hail \i X1LIARIES. 

No. 888— spahiiim's Official 
Canadian Foot Hall 

Guide. 



Edited h.\ Fra n k H. 
Woodworth. Secretary- 
Treasurer Ontario Rugby 
looi Ball In, on. The 

official booh of the game 
In Canada. Price in 
cents. 



No. 294— Official intercolle- 
iriate Aasiociation Soccer 

!'<»<»( Hall 
Guide* 

QStltU- 

tlou and by-laws of the 
Association, pietn ■ 

bis, and official 
rules. Prl 
cents. 





■^SPALDING ATHLETIC LIBRARY/^ 



Group III. Cricket x, ..r^:,';; •',::, ,;,"" * 

Official 





I 



N<>. rt — Spaldlajt'N 
< ri«k«t Uuldc. 

PIlU'M 

No. 277~CMcketj and Huu **.__-_ \T 

to ih,> ,«. Group V. 



. 




5— Spa Id I im's 

«.olt I.,,, 



Golf 

Official 



■ 



Group IV. 



Lawn 



Tannic 
lClIillb 

N... I— N'.'H.lnm's Oftl< 







l.n« ii 




is \iniiiiil. 



No 




T6— Hon to Plm Uolf. 






• 7 — How |o l'ln> 






Group VI. Hockey 

Official 

III.,. I. rj Uill 











^^HHQI^VHVi 



mm 



mm* 



^\ SPALDING ATHLETIC LIBRARY/^ 



\o. 




I r> i — Fit-id Hockey, 

; - althful 

I 

6 e d high] 

I healthful :il I rifairi 

1 manifold ;in<l t b< 

player am 

■iii ac 
1 1 to through ft u i i h p 

prominent In the sport 

sjraith, Wellesley, Bryn Mawr ami 

other Leading colleges. Price 

> O. I 8 8— L a w n 
Hockey j Garden 
Hockey, I'arlor 
Hockey. 

aining the rules 



llliis- 
Cents. 




No. 





I'm- a 



180— Rinff Hockey. 

a new game 
I gymnasium, Invented by 
Dr. J. m. Vorheea of 
Institute. 

sprang 
slant p'i 
i 
hall. 1 
official rales 

HOCKEY U \1MAKY. 

\o. 2W*— Official Handbook 

oi" the Ontario Hock 

Association. 

\. Hew 

of tb< ""'• 

!i. rules oJ 
petition, Hs1 of 

leading 

QtS 

Basket 
Group VII. Ball 

<\ 0< 7_ gpaldlnft'a Official 
Basket Hall Guide, 

Kcllti • 

I Icpbro 

I pn 

if bundredi 

-r pi 



la ndbook 
Hock ey 



No. H>:t— lloiv to l*lay Basket 

Hall. 

Bfepbroa, 
editor of the Official 

I 

tains full Instructions 
for players, both for the 
expert and the 

ifflcials, and 
full- page 

. ■ 
playing. The demand 
book "i i- fully 

Mi-.i In this publication, 
points are Included which could 

porated In the annual publi- 
p1 Ball Gri 
want of room. Price 

\o. 260— Official Basket Han 

for Women. 

Senda 
Smith Col- 
• ontains the of- 
ficial playing rules of 
:il ar- 
ticles on the following 
imes for 
women, i y E. tliti 

and Dea 
Ambersl i nditioB 

ball in the Mid- 
dle West, by \v. P 
State Normal College; psycl n 
ill for won 

leal ef- 
fects of 

; basket 
ball for 

I 
Augusta 

Ball, by Julie Ells!* 

gram of field. Illu l 
iiy pictures of basket ball 





Prie 



m cents. 



It 18KET II \l.l, VI \ll.l \n\ . 

\o. 278— Coll eff late Basket 
Hall Guide. 

The official publl 

i !ontalns 

ollegiat 
und liiyh school 
All Amerli 

Individual players Edited bj 
Fisher, of Columbia. P 




^\SPALDING ATHLETIC LIBRARY^ 3 




Group VIII. Bowling 

\o. s— Sp«ldinflr*fl Ofllelnl 
Itowiinu iiuitl*'. 

y of the Amer- 
ican Bowlii 

Include: 
■ 
diagram! of 

■ 
few i 

I 

o ii a l 
champli • 
ley; bo 

Etulea f..r cocked lint, 
cocked hal iiml feather, quintet, bat- 
tle same, d1 
head pin and f"i 
head p 
game, i< n pin head, l" 

_ _ Indoor 
Group IX. Base Ball 

\o. I>— Spaldlng^a 'HiU'ini in 

iloor IJuh.- Hall Gotde. 

1 1 on a 1 
winter Thl 




Group X. 



Polo 



No. L99— i:<|ii* h| rian PolO. 

Compiled by n. L. 
Fltzpnh New 

Yi.rk Sun. Illustrated 
with portrait! ol lead* 
Ing playera and contain! 
Information 
for poio pin vers. PHet 

(H. 

_ ___ Miscellane- 
GroupXI. ous Games 

\«>. ^il-l.ncniMM*. 

Willi ■ HI 

Hopklni ' 

1 1 
| 

tn I it in I 

| 

of tl • • •: 1 llajj 

ti 01 

v relief 






N». If>— Spalding** 
OtteteJ Roller 
Polo «.nl»l«*. 

I 
I 

\o vm n -'. . Poio, 




1 

lllti! 

n 



Ofll 




g^\ SPALDING ATHLETIC LIBRARY//^ 




\«». 271— Snaldingr'a Official 
Itoiiii*- Guide. 

Tin? official publication 
of the National it..*iu«- 
ition of America. 
Edited by Prof. Charles 
Jacobus, ex-eham p i o a. 
Contains a description 
of the ••"Hits and their 
construct Ion, diagrams 
of the field. Illustra- 
tions, rules and valuable 
Information. Price i" cents, 



No. 1IM— Ilncqucts, Squanh- 
l{n<M|iM*ts ii nil Court Ten* 
uis. 

Tin- need of an au- 
thoritative handbook at 
a popular price on these 
games is filled by this 

i k. Mow io play each 

game is thoroughly t*x- 

plalned, ami all tin- illf- 

Qeult strokes shown by 

specifl i photo g i- a p h s 

taken especially fur this 

book. Contains the official rules for 

each game, with photographs 

well-known courts. Price m cents 



N». ITiW.ish Hull. 



Played with an s 
Inflated ball 8 feet 
diameter, weighing at* 
50 pounds, a 
sists of eleven mi 
book contains i 
official rules and 
sketch <<r tin* game; 
lustrated. P rl 



\o. H— (urliiiur. 





i 



No. I.'l— llovr to Play llanil 
Hall. 

the world's chain* 
pion, Michael Bgan, of 

City. This I k 

Iuih been rev tit 1 1 
brought ■ 1 1 * to dat<- iii 
every particular. Bverj 
j. lay is thoroughly ex- 
plained and 
diagram, The numerous 
itlons con 
made fn.in photographs of 
nipion Rgan, showing him in all 
acteristic attitudes. Price 




Cba 

his 
lo I 



\o. MJ7— (iuoitN. 

By M. \Y Desbong. 

eed of a i r on 

Interesting game 
has been felt by many 
who wished to know the 
fine points and tricks 
used I' 1 . the experts. 
Mr. Deshong explains 

With illustrations. 

h.i t imt a aovh • 
readily understand. Price 




P. IV: 11 








r^rrr| 


l4iJ 


ml 



A Short history of 
this famous Scottish 

pastime, with Instruc- 
tions for [day. rules of 
thi' game, definitions of 
terms and diagrams of 
iliir. rent shots. rrh-e 
!<■ cents. 



\o. SBOT— Bowling on tin* 
Green] or, Lai wit BovfIh. 

How to constraci a 
• isary equip- 
ment; how to play tin* 
game, and the official 
ni.-s as promulgated i.v 
the Scottish Bowling 
lion. Rdit< 
W. Qrelg. llius 
trated, Price 10 cents 




\o. iss-I.uvwi iiu 




Ins the rules for 
Lawn Hockey. Clarden 
Hockey, Hand Tennis. 
Tether Tennis; also Vol 
ley Ball, psirlop Hockey, 
Badminton, Basket Goal. 
io cents. 



\o. isi» — Children's <*amesu 

Compiled bj .i- .;,. n. 
Bancroft, clirector of 
physical training, depart- 
ment of education, New 
York City. These games 
are Intended for 

-. and nil i. ut the 
team games have been 
classes. 
Sultnbh hiUIren 

from three to eight years 
elude a great vain 




^ySPALDING ATHLETIC LIBRARY//* 



Group XII. Athletics 

\n. 12— S|»al<liiiu's Olli<iiil 

ktltletlc llmmmae. 

I Ivan, riii.-i I >* - 1 - - 

Olyijjj. | A»l.- 

df th*' Amat< 
only annual publ 

■ 

«if Individual at! 








Ho. SB7— College ttbletic*. 

well ki ■• 

■ 

hul it 













Nn. isj- All- \rouii.l 

letl< 



\lli- 




No. 1541— AllilH<-\ «.ui(N*. 

| 

htvw 

I 

h in 
\«,. 87— Athletle I'rimer. 

track 

i he 01 p njplfl <••• •»»«'» 
ai Uken* 1906. 

I 
j 

f 

I 
] 



llovi i«. Sprint. 





mum 



t». 






. 



■JHPMMHVOTBBVMV 



^SPALD 



ING ATHLETIC 



L IBRARY/ /^ 



to Knit loti 




>o. 255— How 
\ a rdti 

an, the 
noted 

\\ linen by M :■. M01 I- Mi 
during his recent Amer- 

' in trip, in ''•' 

r i.i 1 1 Mr. 

Morton knows h 
| handle his 

and diree 

' I inns for :il t:i i 

will undoubtedly be of un- 
anee i" the great ma- 
rely on 

Morton's methods «'i* trainh 
novel it. American athletes, bul his 
I bote i<> their 
worth, [llustrated with phot* 
of Mr. Morton In act • 

\o. 17 1 — Dislaiu-c ami Cross- 
« oinilrj K 11 11 ni 111;. 
n, the 
fatuous unlversil 

lViins\ lvnnia P u n n «■ r. 

Tolls now !•► become 

proficient at tii 

dr. half, mile, the 

and 

; r\ running 

I 

training 

■ ■! \\ hen 

u [tb tii leading 

in aH Ion. v\ li i: comm 
dltor nil the good and ha 
points shown, i :'-. 

\o. 249— Athletic Training 
lor Schoolboys. 

Thi- 

cte work 
Kind rot :n tempted. Tin 
W. Or 
i the I'm 
of Pennsj h 

quali 
| j„ ,i to give Inst met lona 

and form B? following the direc 
hoot the 




No« 259— Weight Throw inu. 

ttitchel, 

i hampion a in e r i •■ n n 

bolder 

British and 
(linn cbampia n s h i i> s. 
1 fobs bly ii" 

bad 
■ 

in the w< [ng de- 
athletics. The I K Is 

written in an Instructive way, ami 

a 1 liable tnformatb 
i'"!- the novice. i<ui for the expert as 
well, Illustrated. Prie< 



^portingr 






\o. 55— Official 
Rnlea. 

Contains rules n <> t 
found in 'the:- publica- 

«•!' in:in\ sjh.iIs; rules 

for wrestliu 

I. nan!. 

I pistol 

evolver ah« 
Britlsl ,,,. I 

oot hall rules. Price 

ATIILKTH VI VIM VlilhlS. 

\o. 241— Official Handbook 

oi iii<- \. \.r. 

Tho A.A.U. is ibn 

nnd 
lea must u hold 
under Its rules. 

hisivrly put ill shed 

In tin- 
thh'ln 
club officer hi America. 
'i rules 
lumping, weighl throw- 
ing, hiinlliiiu'. 

Ill >■<■;: 

No. 217— Olympic Handbook. 

i Culture 

iana !' 

r Olym- 
1904. Con- 

• 

Of the 

■ 





«^\ SPALDING ATHLETIC LIBRARY / /^ 



No. -J»- — Official I ntereolle- 
«ial<> \. \. A. \. Handbook. 

Cnti I 

Laws <>f ath- 
utlcs and rulea I 
era the awarding of the 
championship cup 

•llegiate Athletic 

ition of Amateur 

Athletes of America, 

i in- governing i- 

college athletics, Con 

tains official i rcollegiate 

IS7« to date, with the winner's 

tnd time in each event, list of 

points \\ on by .-a.'!! .nil,.-,., and list 

"f officers of the association from 




Group XIII. Athletic 
Accomplishments 



No. 



1880. 



Price i" 



* .\l.t . \. 




\n. 245— Official 
Handbook.. 

d i.y <; i. Hep- 
hron, th*» uc-i 
athletic authority. it 

Contains tl ffielal rules 

governing .-ill sp 
der ti 

tin- ST.M.C.A., a com- 
plete report .,f the 

j' con 

ference, official Sf.M.l 
scoring t.-il-l-s, pen ■ s. many 

pictures of the leading y.M.c.a. 
athletes of the country; official Y.M 
r..\. athletic rulea. constitution am! 

■ >.r id.. Athletic Lei 
\ .M.C.A., all around Indoor »• 
ley i»i n mi. 

No. 281— Official Handbook 
«»i Che Public School* 
Athletic League* 

Tins is the 
lnn.iiiM.Mk of the Public 
Schools Athletic i 
which embraces all the 
public schools of i 

^ "ik. it contains 
i rules that 
all the i 

Of I h< 

Edited bj Dr. Luther II..1 

steal education in the N< 

i'ulilir' schools. llluatrated Price 

So. 274— Intercot- 
leaf ate r r «♦ ^ s 
Country HuimI- 

book . 

• J ill h. ii 

of th.- 
ioi 






77 — How to Swirn. 

By ■). II. Sterrett, a 
leading Atne 

i he In 
structions will Internal 
the experl as well 
in i vht; the illustration* 
were made from photo- 
graphs especially 
showing the swimmer In 
clear water; a valuable 
feature is th. **land drill" 

exercises for th»> beginner, which in 
Illustrated by many drawingi 

comprise: A plea for educa- 
tion in swimming; swimming aa an 
exercise and for development; land 
drill exercises; plain Bwlmming: beat 
methods 
>i roke, etc . etc 

No. «!m; — Speed Swimming:. 

By Champion C, m. 

.. 

Uhletic Club team, 

holder of n a m e r o a i 

American records, ami 

a m e r i c a qualified to 

write on the subject. 

. should be able 

in ih> ipeed In 

tfter reading riiamplon 
inbjcct. 

No. 128— How to How. 

E J. Olannini. of 

CW V'-rk a. c, 
one of America's moat 
famous amateur 

cham pi o n s, 

'i his t k will Instruct 

any one who is a lovr 
lng how to be- 
come an expert. it is 
fiillv Illustrated, 
Ing 1m. u to I1..I1I the oara, the ilnish 
and other Information 
that \\ U : i^ 1 ' 1 '- to the be- 

ginner. Pi Ice i" • 
\o. 28 — Canoeing*. 
ddling, h a I l 1 n 

n. I their 
with )' 

inenl ; the choice 

can 
camping HImm 

cents. 






^ SPALDING ATHLETIC LIBRARY ^ 




No. 209— How to lU'Coinc a 
Ska ter. 

Contains ;mU tee for be- 
ginners; bow i<» become 
!i figure Bkuter tb< 
ly explained, with many 
tiagrams showing bow 
to do all the differeul 
tricks of the besl figure 
skaters, lllustral 

ps of prominent 
iters and num 
lagrams, Price 10 cents. 

No. ^sii- OHi<iaI Roller w 
SkaliiiK Guide. 

Contains direct!* 
becoming proficient as :i 
fancy and trick roller 
skater, and rul< 
roller skating. Pictures 
of promfnenl trick skat- 
ers in rfction. Price 10 

So. 178— How <o Train lor 
Bicycling. 

Gives methods of the 
best riders when train- 
c shorl 
distance races; hints 
on training. Revised 
and up-to-date in every 
particular, 1' v i c e 10 
cents, 



Siting £*J 

GVIOB / § 





Group XIV. 



Manly 
Sports 





No. 1 10— \Vr«»NtliiiK. 

Catch h can 

style. By B. I! 
cock, M.D., of Cornell, 
and u. !'■ Nelligan, of 
Ambersi College, The 
book contains a e a r t y 
aeventj Illustrations of 
the dlfferenl holds, pho- 
tograpbed especially and 
I, scribed that any* 
body who desires to become expert 
in wrestling can with little effort 
every one. Price LO • 

No. IN— Fencing. 

editor "j- the 
Swordsman, and a promi- 

tnatenr fei • 

book thai has stood tin* 

icsi of time, and Is anl- 

acknowlcd 

tandard woi 




\o. LOS— Boxing <-uiue. 

For many years books 

bavo been issued on the 

boxing, inn ii 

baa remained for us t<> 

arrange a i k thai we 

. sure to till all 

uands. it. contains 
• Illus- 
trations snowing all the 
latesl blows, posed 
peclally for this book under Un* 
Ion of a well-known instruc- 
tor of boxing, who makes a specialty 
i.t' teaching and knows how to Im- 
parl iiis know ledge. Price 10 • 

No. 165— The Art of Fencing. 

This j> a new t k by 

and Louts Seuac, 
-it* New York) famous 
Instructors and leading 
authorities on the 
jeet, Messrs. Sena 
in detail bow 
move should in- made, 
and t''U it bo clearly 
ihat anyone can follow 
the Instructions. Price 

\o. 286— How to Wrestle. 

Withoul question the 

• omplete and up- 
to date book mi 
ling tfc •■!■ been 
printed, Edited by F. 
it. Toombs, and devoted 
principally to special 

and illustrations 
i.y I leorge II a 

midt, the ''Russian 
Lion." Price 10 'ruts. 

ho. LOa— Ground Tumbling. 

t Henry Walter 
Worth, who was for 
years physical director 
of the Armour Institute 
A n y 
hoy. by reading this 
tnd following the 
; Ions, can become 
s. Price 10 ■ 
\o. 289— Tumbling for Ama- 
teur*. This )inn! . was BpeC | ftl . 
ly compiled for thi 
of amateurs i>. 
James T. Gwathmey, 

• .«f the Van.hr- 

hiit University Gymnas- 
ium, Nashville, Tenn, 
ariety of th. pas- 
time is explained by 
text and the 

latter forming a very important fea« 

the i k, over loO d 

• shown. Price 1" «'ts. 






<^\ SPALDING ATHLETIC LIBRARY //^ 

No. 191— How io Pa neb the tin. 202— Med lei ne Ball Bx- 

lt:iii. 

full page 
I 




publics • 

■ 

No. I 13— Indian Clnbi 
Dumb-Bella. 

uhir f 

■ 




I. ut a 
;iih1 <»ul Ol 

\o. -i-h.iiiM w el*h1 Rxer- 



No. 166— Hoti Io 

dlan < inits. 







No. 20O— Dumb-Bella 




g PAlDINC .-s 

1" /'PUlllY 



I 
















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Group XV, 

Gymnastics 

No. in: Oi 







^SPALDING ATHLETIC LffiRARY/y^ 





\o. 214 — Graded Callatnen- 
lOfl a ml Du in l»-ll«'ll Drills. 

I: a 

itS "I 

111 thai 

WOUld harmonize with il 

ituus <»f 

set drill, never varied from one 
year's end i<> the other, 
the begin 

ad amounl 
member. With a tag uni- 

formity ihi' presenl ti 
tempted. Price 10 ci 



\o, *j."i i — Barn join 
Bar Bell Drill. 

■ i by Dr, B. Talt 
McKeuzle, Dlrei 
Blcal I CTniver- 

Ivania. 

Profusely illusl r a L »• d. 

Price i" cents. 



No. 153 — Indoor and Outdoor 

<. > in iiastif Games. 

Without qnestii 
of the of its 

kind over pul 
V piled by Prof. 

V. M. 

I ! 

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and gath< 
are a iiuuilx unused. The 

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Price i" " 



No. 287— Fancy Dumb ll«*U 
and Marching Drills. 



\ M. 



* \ :■:•>■■ R 

IT \ 



man town < 

i be am hor 
All concede that . 

during 

set drills and nn 

I f we 

game-and-play 

■ 

i ben dumb bells v. be the 

il look 

to mass 

did t.> 

drills. 

while designed primarily for 

ly with girls 
and women, Profui 




Group XVI. 



Physical 
Culture 




No. L24— iiow 

i,\ in ii n si. 



to lle<»om« k a 



of | 



i\, 



\ mm | 



Roberl Stoll 

the nv>\ ^-li \ 
American cbami 
the i! 

who Crequi 

l..u the lllu 
instructions In 
and wiili n lit I 

ecoim- proficient on i ! . 
eontal and paralle] bars, the trapeze 



No. 1 61— Ten Minn tea* Exer- 
<*is«' for Itusy Men. 

". Luther tlalsey 

Director of Phy- 

Training in the 

■ bools. 

■ i com 

ihysieal 

borne would 

i to procure a 

i 
anyone can follow, it already has 
bad n la 

till who hi 

\o. 208— Phyntcal Education 
and Hyiciene. 

•| bl 
t 1»«- r ' raining 

■ 
I it*, nit;, 185, 213, 261, 

■ iii-.. 

cer 

er IV 
the children. 













■^\ SPALDING ATHLETIC LIBRARY /7° 



lli-Thrr.Mir of the Body. 

■giro 



No. 
I 




A book thai all who 
value health shoal 
and follow its instruc- 
By Prof. 1:. B. 
\v a r in b ii, the well- 
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Training 





No. 142— Physical 
Simplified. 

By Prof, p. B. Wtut 
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complete, thorough 
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the whole man is con- 
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\o. lsr>— Health Hints. 

jr.. Warman, 
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and authority on 
eal culture Prof. War 
man tn Inter- 

estingly '-f health in- 
ttuenced hy Insulation; 
health by mi 

derwear; ]>■•:■ li ]■ Influenced 
l.y color; exercise, Price 10 cents. 

No. 218— 285 Health Answers, 

B. P. Wniitiiiii. 
Contents: Ni i 
■ 
mer; three rulei f<«r bl- 
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JiiH: sitting 

iiut ulghtft; ventilating 
oom; vt-ntii 

bathing; sail 

• ItUte for lei in 

somnla nts. 

No. 288— Mnscle Building. 

Dr. P. IP i 
Director <>( l'l« 
Training in tbi 
S 
completi "ii the 

[llus 



Ml Mill gl 




No. 2*14 — School Ta etics 

Hase Running 

rills for 

Lutber 

>>( Vhi Ining in 

the 8 



u ml 




\o. i£«»i — Tensing Elxeveise* 

K. Prof. B. B \V;,r- 

man, and uniform with 
• r publicai ions <»n 

Scientific Physical Train- 
■ • Spalding's Aih- 

]< tic Library Nos, 142, 

l 19 166, 185, 20*8, 218, 

290). The "Tensing" <t 

"Resisting*' 

muscular exercises is the 
most thorough, the most complete, 

• isfactory, and t he most 
fascinating of systems. Priet 




Muscu- 




No. 2H5— Healthi hy 
lar <•> mnast lea. 

Wiih bints on Bight 
H 

ileal Direc- 
rmantown i Pa. i 
y.m r..\. The 

I tftVJlt 

rcise among 
tin- masses and knowing 
• in the | 
■ 

omrehesdi 

the author fell 11 his privilege to 

write one which is simple and the 

i.f which Is within the reach 

of all. if one win practise the 

the hints t: 
II be amply re- 
paid to cents. 

No. 2ss — Indigestion Treated 

h> <■> in nasi i«-N 

W. J, Cromle, 
Physical Dl 

maiitou ii ( Pa. i Y M 

book deals 

U 1 1 1 1 II 

touts aiid treatment «<f 
stlon and lu«li- 
lt embraces 
ore, mental 
cull and 

photographic ii 

which tend to eure I 

it" the hints therein i 
■ 

tin- . nt \h> helped, 

tits. 




No. !!<»<»—(, et Hell 
W. II. 

■ 

;l IiIIIIiImT of I- 

i h .• NpnldliiK Athletic 
i traln- 

Priet 



K e . 



I 



| CONSTITUTION AND 
I PLAYING RULES 

§) OF THE 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 

^ v 

PROFESSIONAL 

i 

1 BASE BALL CLUBS 

1907 
/ OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 



NEW YORK 

American Sports Publishing Company 
_m war ken si r] 



'S 



Constitution of the National League 
of Professional Base Ball Clubs 

1907 

Adopted March 3. 1904. 
Amended December 1.905: February. 1906, and February. 1907. 



Name. 
SECTION 1. Thi ition shall be called tfat 

tional League of Professional Base Ball Clubs. 

Objects. 
SEC. 2. The objects of this League 
i. To immortalize base ball as the national game of the 
United Si 

2. To surround it with such safeguards as to warrant 
absolute public confidence in its integrity and methods. 

3. To protecl an«l promote the mutual interests of pro- 
onal base ball clubs and professional base ball playt 

and 

4. To establish and regulate the professional bas< 
championship of the United Stairs. 

Membership. 

SEC. 3. This League shall consist of eighi clubs (the 
membership shall ised or diminished exi 

by unanimous consent of the League), located in and rep 
nting the following cities, to wit: Boston, New York, 
Brooklyn, Philadelphia, Pittsburg, Cincinnati, Si. I 
an d I and in no eyenl shall there be mure than one 

club in any city. 

Withdrawal from Membership. 
SEC. 4. Any club member of the League unable to mcc 
the obligations it I ■-'< the League for • 

mission to dispose of its rights and franchises as a member 
u in thai ome other corporation. In 

111 if. ih- 



p from one company I be 

understood thai the new member mall assume with I 
franchise and ipany all the 

liilin- risibilities and obligati 

tin- retiring company. It must d by the 

Ing and new company that the company retiring shall 
not I tion 

entered into by it to this League until all of said conti 
and obligations have been fully p determined by the 

company accepting it > membership, ri jhts and franchi 

Admission to Membership. 

SEC. 5. \ company to be admit! mbership in 

must firsl deKver to the the 

application signed by and 

company is regularly organi and 

mply with I 

titution Such api ihall at 

transmitted b try to tru 

who shall immediately in- 
application, said report to be commu 
through 

SEC. 6. i i hip 

shall be by ballot, a three-fourtl 

In Regard to Vacancies. 
SEC. 7. In 
this organization during the 
nominate t<» all ii 

or mall, ' tlie 

club 

the next annual i 
all 

Termination of Membership. 
3EC. 8. 



j. By allowing open betting or pool selling upon its 
grounds or in any building owned or occupied by it. 

i. By playing any game of ball with a elub that is dis 
qualified or ineligible under this Constitution. 

5. By offering, agreeing, conspiring or attempting to lose 
am [ ball; or failing to immediately expel 
player who shall he proven guilty of offering, agreeing, 
conspiring or attempting to lose any game <.f ball, of ol 
being interested in any pool or wager thereon. 

6. By disbandment of its organization or club team 
during "tin- championship season. 

7. By failing or refusing to fulfill its contractual Obli- 
gations. . . , , t , 

By failing or refusing to comply with any lawful re- 
quiremenl of the Board of Directors. % 

ilfully violating any pr< t this Constitu- 

tion M,-' the legislation or [.laying rules made in pursuance 
thereof, or any violation of the provisions of the National 
.Agreement. 

The Expulsion of Clubs. 

SEC 9. To carry into effect the provisions of Section X 
of this' Constitution; the facts in am fered by such 

■ „,„ m ust he reported to the Secretary oi the League, 
who .Inll at once notify by mail or telegraph the party 
charged with the specified default or offense, and inquire 
whether any dispute exists alleged. In case 

the fact, are disputed, the Board shall after due notice, 
try the case under such regulation, as ihey may prescribe; 
, ml their finding shall he final and conclusive on all par 
, in cas( Ision, when such finding shall be I 

warded to each club, which shall transmit to the Secretary 
written ballots "For Expulsion or Against Expulsion ; 
and if seven clubs vote "For Expulsion the Secretary shall 

notify all clubs of the forfeiture ol membership oi the party 

chat ■■ 

Dues and Assessments. 

SEC 10 i Each cluh shall pay to the Secretary, on or 

before the first day of April of ^h year, the sum of $i 00.00 

mnn | dues; and such Other sums as from tune to tune 

]i( , for the payment oi salaries of officers and 

'■; ,-,„. sl1c h other expi may be incurred 

border of tWs f-eague or the Board of Dir Uso 

ait fines and penalties imposed by said League or its Board 

;, f ; | u pon a chih or upon any eluh officer, pla 



d in 
with H, 

Officers. 
SEC. 11. 

coirni 

« « 









The Secretary's Duties 
SEC. 12. 

SEC. 



shall be entitled b stationery, blanks and 

materials as the actual duties of his - uire. 

SEC. 14. I he Secretary shall keep a record of all in- 
fractions of the rules and regulations of the League that 
may come under his notice, and shall make a report on the 
same to the Board at it 3 in 

SEC. 15. '! he President and Secretary shall n 
lirh salaries ..s the Board by vote shall determine, and 
shall be reimbursed for all traveling expenses actually in- 
curred by them in the service of the League; and" the 
,act from them such guarantees for the faith- 
ful performance of their duties as they would deem for 
the tfety of the L< I the expiration of 

their terms of office they shall account for, and deliver up 
to the Board, all the property and papers which may have 
hands b d their offices. 

SEC. 16. The Board ol Directors shall consist of the 
,,1,-nt and five other members, to be chosen at the 
animal meetii Hoi 

SEC. 17. In case of vacancy in the Board by reason of 
1 ] I< . death, re lisqualiheation of any 

Director, tin- club of which lie was^a member, at the time 
he was chosen, shall designate his 1 . and at once 

notify the Secretary. But if such vacancy is caused by the 
withdraw disqualification of a club n ; 

n ,; : , Board, the Board may till the va< 
,,, the same manner as provided for tl >n of 

Directors in Section ir. 

Qualification of Directors. 

SEC. 18. No person shall be qualified \^ act as Director 

who is nnt an actual member of the club he represents: 

nor shall any club under any circumstances, be represented 

l )V n on the Board of Directors ; nor 

s h a ii any Director sit in the trial of a cause in which his 

is interested. 

SEC. 19. The Board shall meet annually on the mom 

it 12 o'clock no 
annual u ■w is to 

be i„.] ( | l.in may hold special meetings Upon the call of the 

whenever urg 
may require. 
SEC. 20. The Board shall prepare a detailed report of 
all their doings, and present the same in writing to the 



8 

annual meeting; which report shall, if ac« 
1. be filed with the Secretary, together with all of& 
papers, d< and property which may have come Into 

their 11 by virtue of tlu*ir of& 

SEC. 21. The Board shall have a general supervision 
and man of all the affairs, and bu I the 

including the award of the '•ham; md such 

other (hit i( d upon them 

hy th itution, or by legislation made in pursua 

there be the s< >le and • tribunal 

the trial "f managers or pi any violation of this 

ititution ur of the playing rules or other rules of dis- 
cipline, u League by a three-fourth 
club membership, shall otherwi shall be 

and exclusive trih disputes 

between i 

or player of another club, or by a mat i against 

his own club, or an app< tl I 

sion or expulsion by his own club, or complaint by the 

osn- 
ply with Constitution requi the 

adjudication oi I this 

•itution, the i 
in pursuance th« i 
SEC. 22. The B ll adopl and 

the hearing and determin 
[] disputes and complaints brougl them. Wl 

i violation of thh 
Rul( mplaint 

I within • 

the : the 

thin 
I in 

the • 

with \ hich 

full 

difft 

II he final 

any 



9 

another club (prior to the expiration of the championship 
ion) for conduct in violation of any provision of tliis 
Constitution, or prejudicial to the good repute of the game 
of bast- ball; and shall have power to require the club, to 
which such player or manager may belong, to discipline him, 
and upon repetition of such offense to expel him. Provided, 
thai such complaint be preferred in writing, giving such 
particulars as may enable the Board to ascertain all the 
facts, and such particulars shall be transmitted to ibc Sec- 
:!>-. by whom it shall at once be referred to the Board. 
SEC. 24. In case a player, under contract with a League 
club, shall, during a current season, prefer a complaint in 
writing to the Secretary of the League against such a 
club, alleging that such club is in arrears to him for sal- 
ary for more than fifteen day- after such salary became due 

int of such contract, the Secretary shall at 01 
transmit to the said club a copy of such complaint, and re 
quire an answer thereto. On receipt of such answer, or if 
five days shall have elapsed withoul receipt of an answer, 
the Secretary shall refer the papers in the case to the Board 
,,f Directors, and should the Board bud the player's com- 
plaint sustained, they shall require the club, under penalty 
of forfeiture of its membership, to pay to the player forth- 
with the full amount ascertained to be due him. Provi< 
that should tin- player refrj •' club pending ac- 

tion by the Board on his complaint, he will thereby forfeit 
the I I the award, and in such case the Board shall 

.ird. 
SEC. 25. The Board shall promptly hear an appeal made 
by any person who shall have been expelled, suspended or 

iplined by bis club, excepl in expulsion as pi 

vided in Section 3& Such : : ail. within thirty days 

;( f trr the date of the expulsion, suspension or discipline. 

file with the Secretary a written statement of his defense, 

by ;i request that an appeal be allowed him 

cretary shall notify the club of the request for an 

ttch notice W ith ;i r^py Ot the appeal ; 

and at the next meeting of the Board the dub, by its duly 
authorized representative, and the appellant in person, 
by attorney or by written statement, shall appear before the 
rd with their testimony. The Board shall impartially 
tter ami render thru- decision, which shall 
final and forever binding nn both club and player. 

SEC. 26. Anv player under contract or reservation who 
may consider himself uniustL: treated or wronged by his 



IS 



10 

dub shall have \hf right i<- submil to the Pri 

rlciit of the League, who ->hi\\\. a I 
ceming the matt< i 

ing, recommendation or adjud rd shall 

have authority t< • i pecuniary penalty 

on a '-lull, ;i manager or if warranted by their 

findings and d may imp 

trials and hearing or both pan 

■y be remil 
upon appeal duly i ; 
and heard ;ii an annua] 






Individual Club Control. 
SEC. 27. Each club shall ha jht t<> regulate 

own and tn di pun- 

ish, suspend its own manager, players or other 

cmpli th« e i" 'V. < i s >hal! m <i be limtl • ■ 

dishonest pla> or open insubordination, lnu shall include 
■ill quest ther conduct 

oi the player thai may be regarded by th< prejudi- 

cial to its interest, and wflicl with any provision oi 

this Constitute 

Punishment of Scandalous Conduct. 
SEC. 28. 

■ 
imp< 

ilty, in pill 

• the 
bring 

Die 

Such tii)> foard "f 1 

■ a hearing upon appeal dul) 

Club Territorial Rights. 
SEC. 29. Ittsive 



■Mm 



•11 

Reservation of Players 

SEC. 30. Each club a member of this ! -ill be 

entitled to the right of reservation. On or before the 20th 
<l.i of - in each year each club shall transmit to 

the Secret ■ list of the players whose service 

desires to retain for il u on, and hen 

under contract aid club for the current or for any 

i-.iii or seasons, and in addition thereto tin* 
names of such play< rved in any prior annual list who 

refused to contract with said club. Such players, to- 
gether with all others thereafter to be regularly contracted 
with, namely, 1 > 1 ; 1 •■. have been secured by purchase 

or draft under the National Agreement for future services 
shall be ineligible to contract with any other club in this 
pi as hereinafter provided. No club shall have 
hen in arrears of salary to 
him. The S< hall promulgate such lists on or bo 

mber 25th of each year. 

Negotiating for Services. 
SEC. 31. No player, without the consent of the club 
with which fa nation, shall enter 

into negotiations with any other dub tor future .services- 
Contracts. 
SEC. 32. Contracts made between a club and its play- 
•mv bi either by telegram or writing, to be follov 
within ten days thereafter by a contract in the form ap- 
proved and promulgated by the President to all the clubs 
of the I i . r 

SEC. 33. Th< League shall a«lopt such form 

may deem besl For the protection of the rights of the 
parties thereto. All contracts musl be approved by the Pres 
idenl and duly promulgated by him. Whenever a club re 

player, immediate notice mu en the Pi 

dent of the League, who shall, al once, notify all clubs 

md for a period of ten daj uch 

not j ; ,t, any other club oi the League 

-him the player released and 

t 1 4 1 the player shall be ineligible 

however, that when a club desir< 

out ; rlub -hall notify the IV 

dent of 1I1- 1,uI! iin " 

notify all other National 

b to notify iin- President oi its waiver 




12 



within ten days will operate as a legal waiver. If, however, 
a club of this League refuses, in writing, to waive claim, then 
the following rule shall apply: [f the player sought to he re- 
teased out of the League is a purchased player, or othen 
acquired save by draft, the President of the League shall fix 
the price to b<- paid by the club refusing to waive claim, with 
this proviso; that the amount so fixed shall not exo 
$1,000. If the player be a drafted player, then (he drafting 
price shall he paid. In cases where two or more clubs re 
to waive claim, the claims of the clubs shall be determined by 
lot by the President of the J In all cases, how 

the club asking for the waiver shall have theprivih 

taming the player sought to be disposed of, if it so 
The following limitations shall apply to all waivers: (i) If 
waiver is secured between playing seasons it shall expire at the 
expiration of ten days from the beginning? of the succeeding 
championship season. (2) If secured during the champion- 
ship season, it shall expire at the expirati< »n of thirty days from 
. hen waiver is requested from 1 [eadquai 

Suspension and Expulsion of Players. 
SEC. 34. Any player, while under contract with, or 
reservation by. a League club, who shall without the con- 
sent of such club, enter the ; any other club in any 
capacity, shall be liable to expulsion by Said lub. 
Whenever a club suspends or expels a n 
that club shall at once notify the Secretary of this keag 
ting the date when the S 

. the cause thereof. 
sec. 35. No r or player, who has been sus- 

hi a 1 .ramie clttb, shall at any I 

thereafter be allowed to play with, or serve in any capacity, 
any League club (either the - elling him or any 

other) unless the terra of m by the club 

pired, or upon his appeal to this such expulsion or 

nsion shall h Ide. 

Effect of Club Disbandrnent. 
SEC. 36. The disbandmenl with- 

drawal from or 1« 1 ne niemb- 

of its players fr<»in contract and reservation with 
I club, but the right 
players shall revert to the ' all be Bub 

to transfer to such Other club as the '«ate 

their said 



^^^^p^^^^^^^^^^* 



13 

Playing with Outside Clubs. 

SEC. 37. No game of base ball shall be played be- 
tween a League club and any other club thai has been ex- 
pt lied from membership in this League. No game of ball 
shall be played between a League club and any other club 
employing or presenting in its nine a player expelkd, or 
under suspension from the League, or otherwise ren- 
dered ineligible by this League or a club member thereof. 

Crookedness and its Penalties. 

SEC. 38. Any person who shall be proven guilty of 
offering, agreeing, conspiring or attempting to cause any 
game of ball to result otherwise than on its merits under 
the Having Rules, shall be forever disqualified by the 
President of the League from acting as umpire, manager, 
player or in any other capacity in any game of hall parti 
cipated in by a League club. 

Umpires. 
SEC. 39. A staff of League umpires shall be selected by 
the President before the opening of the regular season. 

1. Applicant for the position of umpire must state age, 
residence, experience, habits and such other qualifications 
as may be prescribed on forms prepared by the President, 
which must have the endorsement of those who from skilled 
and personal knowledge can recommend the applicant for 
the position. 

[ndependenl of such endorsements, however, the Presi- 
dent shall make inquiries and inform himself, as far 
practicable, as to the merits and qualifications of each ap- 
plicant. . . , ,. 

2. They shall be paid sueh salaries and allowed 

CX p. may be mutually agreed upon by contraci be- 

tween them and the Presidenl of the League, subject to the 
approval of the Board of Directors oi the League. 

Bu1 ;it leasl ten per cent, of current salaries shall be with 
held by tie- President until the termination of In- contract 
for that season to sccurr such deductions for absences and 
the paymenl of such fines a- may be lawfully imposed. 

nt of the failure of an nmpirr to umpire 

a game assigned to him it shall be the duty of the Presi- 
denl to provide a substitute to nmpirr such game; and in 
such case there shall be deducted from the next payment to 
the umpire the sum of twelve dollars for each game as- 



14 









'1 to hull, which [( liled 

to umpire. 

4. ft shall be the dut) of 1 ach 1 <eague 1 lub 
utnpii try championship game such un ■ 

stitute as the President shall assign to such game In 1 1 1 * * 
the non-appearance of the League umpire or mb 
stitutr at the hour appointed for ning of th^ 

iptain shall ilun of the sub- 

stitute players <>\ the opposing club, and tin- two plaj 
thus selected shall uly authorized umj 

5. It shall be the duty of un: lies 
as they are written, n pinion as 
their merits, snbj( ident's instru 

tlu-ir proper interp • them- 

es with th< 

»f the President, assigning their 
uniform on the pi 

Supervision of Umpires. 
SEC. 40. All complaints against umpires shall be Mib- 
mitted in writing or b vfn> 

shall taki 
by thr gi the charg 

>f the umpire complained of and 

dem< .vilt'ul violatioi 

fusal to i 1 <»r 

rentlemaniy lai lucl while officiating as an 

umpire, and if up 

i or 

Committees. 

( SEC. 41. the 

II appoint 
Rui< 

tmendm 

The Championship. 
SEC. 42. Th<- Championship 

SEC. 43. | |; 



■i 



MM 



15 

su< h date in April or May to such date In Septemb* 
October as the League may determine at its stated or 
meeting. 
SEC. 44. Every game played between two club- from 
the commencement of tin- championship season to the 
completion of the championship series I uch clubs 

shall be a game £or\he championship, and u< club 

shall li-nd or exchange pla or with each other for 

any game played during the championship season. Any 
violation of this section shall ach offender to a 

fine of $100. 

SEC. 45. Each club shall play r more cham- 

pionship games with every other club: but a tie or draw 
game or a game prevented by rain <>r other causes shall 
be played <>(\ on the same ground on the next or a 

date of tin same or subsequi -. whether open 

eduled for another game between the same clubs, thus 

ng double garni i hedule date, [f, how-? 

both series shall have terminated, such postponed 

game must be played off on the ground of the other club 

on . pen or scheduled during a subsequent series 

between the same clubs. 

SEC. 46. Each club shall have half of the champion- 
ship series of games with every other club played on its 
epi as otherwise provided in Section 45: and 
in all the details of such games, thai do not involve the 
rights of the visiting club under the Playing Rules, but 
re l a t, 1 such games as attractive exhibitions t«> the 

patrons of the home club, the visiting club shall defer to 
\\u- home club; provided, nevertheless, that 
home -dub shall not be permitted to change the usual 
for the commencemenl les in its par- 

ticular citv more than thirty (30) minutes without first 
having obtaini «sent of the visiting club then 

under a penalty to the visiting club oi $500. The visiting 
r l n l, person designated by the home club 

the batting order of its aim morning 

of t] h game, or the evening previous, if re 

quested. In case of the failure of any visiting club to fur- 
nish the batting <>v<\>v of its nine as herein stipulated, it 
shall forfeit the sum of $10, which amount shall be bu- 
rn, diately transmitted to th< tie, upon 
,l„. from bun of the infliction of such 
I'm., which notia hall be ratary upon 
, omplainl from the home club. 
Ji shall be the duty of the home club to furnish 1 



16 

manager and captain of the visiting club with a list of the 
batting order before the commencement of the game un 
similar penalties for default as herein prescribed, The 
visiting club shall have the righl to practice its nine on the 

grounds of the home club between El and u o'clock A. M. 
on each day of its visit during the championship season. 

r 
The Championship Schedule. 

SEC. 47. All championship games shall be arranged in 
a written schedule prepared hy the Schedule Committee, 
and reported to and adopted by the League by n three- 
fourths \ i the beginning ol the championship 
son. The schedule shall provide for an equal numtx 
return games, and shall specify the date of each game and 
the date of eacl . No date in laid schedule 
shall subsequently be chai (i) hy written 
-incut of two clubs from a 1 by the schedule 

n such clubs i date on I 

und; or (2) a the 

written 1 V. 

Any club or clubs violating tl n shall be amen- 
able to a penalty of $1,000. lid with- 
in forty-eight hours I 

if nol so paid to be withheld from any fund- to their 

d in 
violation m shall not count in the champion- 

ship 

The Admission Fees and Receipts. 

SEC. 48. '! in- - 1 champi 

ship h club shall 

the admission fee to which shall be I 

all division of pei shall be made on 

1 that part of the grounds 
the 

•ich part of said grounds all di . 

per. 

At the conclusion of each champi* 
club shall deliver to the m ting club 

1 transmit by mail to tl 

ceil 



17 

The Ball Park. 

SEC. 49. Each park shall be provided with a sufficient 
number of exits and entrances {not exceeding four) for 
the accommodation of the public, and a entrance 

shall be maintained for the convenience of the press rep- 
tnd those entitled to the courtesies of the 
grounds. 

i Additional enti tay be opened upon holidays, 

hut for such da>> the visiting club -hall be given at !■ 
ten days' notice of the whole number and their location. 

j. Kmt-1 - may be opened at any time by con- 

g club, it occasion requires. 

X Each park shall also be provided with proper and 
nuabi.' dressing room or rooms for visiting players, the 
same n< be supplied with toilet conveniences, h«.t and cold 
water, and shower bath-., and to contain twenty suitable 
lockers for such players. Such dressing rooms to be pi 
erly heated and ca and made subject to the control 

during the occupancy thereof of the players of the visiting 
club. The penalty for failure to provide and maintain 
such hall he twenty-five dollars ($25.00) 

for 1 of failure to provide the same according to 

this nde. the same to b< and collected by the 

Seen gue upon complaint of the visiting 

club. 



The Turnstile Count. 

SEC. 50. The numb I on admitted to tlw 

md hall be determined b) the ase of the necessary 

number of self-registering turnstiles, the arms of which 

shall extend within four inch.- of a dividing pardon, the 

which shall be delivered to the agenl oj th»- vi n 

,-lnl, before the opening of the- grounds for each game; 

.md said agent of the visiting club shall have full access 

1 1 . , and the box of such turnstile shall not be 

removed until after the close of the seventh inning, and in 

I for each person ad- 
mitted throug hall at oner be delivered to the 
,1 of th< club. '\ In- visiting dub 3 hall have 
the righl to accept the turnstile counl for each and all 
games, or to count all tickets. Each club shall be required 
to use for it tantial pasteboard tickets, winch 
can be readily counted. 



«*< 



18 

Special Entrance. 

SEC. 51. \ ( » person shall be admitted hti m- 

pionship gann ntesting 

clubs, umpires, policemen in uniform, ne< 
of the Imiin- club I the pn »s and 

inviti the Presidenl of the home club may 

i proper I ill of whom must pass through 

ring turnstile at the special entrance provided 
for tli" press, and said turnstile shall I the 

same right of on by the visiting club thai 

vided in all other entrances. 

i. It shall b< y of the Presidenl of the I . 

inspect all ball parks from time to time, and to report to 
tin- Board of Directors any failure to comply with I 
or any ol m of tli'- Constitution. 

Stopping Play to Catch Trains. 
SEC. 52. Qn any day when either club is required to 
leave a cit} to, or in order to reach another citj in time, 
where it is scheduled to play its next game, the home club 
shall be compelled, upon proper notice by the visiting 
club, to begin the game thi a half before the 

time of the departure of the last train 1 of which 

either dub can reach ml in time And 

either club m l1 any time within i 

aid train time witl privi- 

and the m time. 

Giving out Admission Checks. 
SEC. 53. In rain 

. the 

hum- ,-lnl, n 

ued, the 
be entitli 
but if Midi lub shall 



Forfeited Games. 
SEC. 54. 

nine 



19 

ship game mall award the game to ucli club <m account 
of the violation 1>y tin- contesting duh of any section of 
this Constitution or of any playing rules. In the event of a 
forfeiture for an) reason, the forfeiting club shall incur 
such penalty i thousand dollars as may bs 

imposed 1>> the Board of Directors after a hearing held 
within one week from the dat< ! i game, and any 

damages suffered by the non-offending club shall be paid 
out of such penalty. In addition to the penalty above re- 
ferred to, the captain or m the per- m in charge 
of the offending team and responsible for the team I. 
ing the field, shall incur a penalty of one hundred dollars, 
which shall he paid within five days to the Secretary of the 
League, said penalty not to he remitted under any circum- 
stances. In h penalties are m>t paid within ten 
days after being imposed, the club and player cannot p 
ticipate in a championship game. 



Drawn Games. 

SEC. 55. Drawn, tie and postponed games shall not 
count in the fames (but any game of not less than 

five innings shall be included in the averages), but must 
be played ible, as provided in Section 45. If 

they cannot be played off, as therein provided, they may 
subsequently be played off, if sufficient lime exists before 
the close of the season. 

Double games for one admission shall nol be permitted 
unless previously scheduled as such or rendered compul- 
by the playing off of postponed games, as provided in 
Section 45. 

Winning the Pennant. 

SEC. 56. The club which shall have won the greatesl 
percentage of games in the championship series, shall be 
declared the champion club of the United Stat-.--, for the 
on in which such games were played. In the event 
that two or more clubs shall have won the same p 
cent tmes, then the Board shall at once arrang 

of three games between any two of such 
clubs, such games to be played at the close of the cham- 
pionship season, and the games so played shall be included 
in the championship record, and counted in determining 
the the championship, fn^ such case onlj the p 

ions of this Constitution prohibiting the playinj 



20 

ling as championship games, gam* 
piration of the championshi snail have no eflf 

The emblem of the championship shall be a pennant 
the National colors) than one hundred 

dollars ($100), It shall be inscribed with the m 
"Champion Base Ball Club of the United States/' with the 
name of the club and the year in which the title was won, 
and the champion club shall be entitled in fly the pennant 
until the close of the ensuing year. 



Deciding the Championship, 

SEC. 57. The championship shall be decided in the 
following manner: Within twenty-four hours after every 
match game played for the championship, the home club 
shall prepare and forward to th< iry of iln- L« 

nt containing the full i core nf I >nl 

ified in tlir Playing Rules, together 
with the date, the place where played, the name of the 
clubs ,ui<1 umpire, provided that no tie or drav hall 

be considered a game for any purpose except the & 

and provided, further, thai in air rtiere the 

Secretary shall not receive the championship 

game within five days after the playing of such game, the 
dub whose duty it is to forward svu-h 'I pay to 

iln League the sum of $2 as the p h default 

At the close of the season the ill prepai 

tabular statement of tl won and fosl by each club, 

■ him, ^vhich statement 
shall 1><* the sole evidence in the matter, and submit the 
same, with tl 1 -••nt him, to the Board, which 

II make the award in writing, and report the sam 
the I it- annual n 

In making the award the ler: 

r. The tabular statemeni of the Secretary* 

2. Forfeited garni 

3. Games participated in by club* which have with- 
drawn, disbai ited their membership without 
completing their championship series with all other Lea 
club 1 the following; extent : 

Hie rtain the leasl number of cham- 
pionship club with b remain- 
ing in tl partici- 
d in thv h retired 
club, counl in the series of each I milar 



21 

number of games, and all other games participated in by 
Mich retired club shall not be counted in the championship 
series. Provided, thai if such retired club shall have 
failed to play at least one championship game with every 
League club, all games participated in by it shall be thrown 
<>ut entirely. 

Meetings. 
3 EC. 58. The annual meeting of the League shall be 

held on the second Tuesday in December of each year, 
at 2 o'clock P. M., and at such places as shall have been 
determined by a vote at the previous* annual meeting. 

SEC. 59. Special meetings may be called by the Presi- 
dent of ibis League on his own option or on the written 
eall of six clubs. 

Club Representation. 
SEC. 60. At such meeting each club shall be repre- 
sented and shall be entitled to two representatives, and 
to have in addition thereto any of its officers or ex-officers 
present at such meetings; but no club shall be permitted to 
I as a representative any person under contract or 
engagement as a ball player or manager, and belonging to 
tin- nine of said club in such capacity They shall, if re- 
quested by any other club representative, present a certifi- 
cate of their appointment duly attested by at least two 

officers of their club showing their authority to act, but no 
club shall have more than 01 

Executive Session. 
SEC. 61. This League may. upon a majority vote of its 
members, elect to go into executive session for the trans 
action of its business, and during such session no club 
shall be entitled to more than two representatives. 



Quorum. 
SEC. 62. A representation of a majority of clubs shall 
Constitute a quorum for the transaction of business, but a 
levs number Way adjourn from time to time until a quorum 
ibtained. WTien obtained i1 may he maintained by lodg- 
ing the doors of the meeting room, the appointment of 
dooi nd such other procedures usual in parliamen- 

maintain quorums and dispatch business. 



22 

Order of Business. 
SEC. 63. The following shall be the order of business 
unless .suspended by a three-fourths vote of the club mem 

hers : 

i. Reading minutes of last meeting. 

Report of Board of Dii 

3. Report of Commit' 

4- Election of new memb< 

5. Amendment t)i Constitution. 

6. Adoption of Playing Rules. 

7. Election of offii 

X. Miscellaneous busii 
9. Adjournment. 

Amendments. 
SEC. 64. (1) The Constitution of this League maj 
red or amended by a three-fourtl 

at any annual m< by a unanimous vote at 

ided, however, that this section ai 
tions .1. 8, a, 38, 48 shall not > 
cept bv a unanimous vote of this Leagtl 
tion of this Constitution may be suspende provision 

made non-applicable by unanimou 1 a Lea 

meeting. 




■m 



CORRECT DIAGRAM OF A BALL FIEU> 

z 




Enlarged Section Showing 
Home Base. 



63. 4St^ mmm4 J^^&4&& mmmm >5 

6*S 



I 



« 



>W 



\ 0/§\ \ / 




M 



24 



OFFICIAL PLAYING RULES 

OF PROFESSIONAL BASE BALL CLUBS 

As adopted at the meeting of the Joint Playing Rules Con 
of the National League and the American League, held at National 
League Headquarters, New York City, March 2, L904. 
Amended February 14. 1906, and February 25, 1007. 



Amendments indicated by >' 



The Ball Ground. 

The hall ground must be em (osed. To ob~ 
RULE 1. viale thi iiy for ground rules, the 

wiest distance from a fund on 

fair territory to the home base should he 235 feet and from 
home base to thi grand stand 90 t 

To Lay Off the Field. 
To lay nft the lines defining the lo< 
RULE 2. ( ,f the several bases, the and the 

pitcher's position and to establish the boun- 
daries required in playing the game of base ball, pn 
follov 

Diamond or Infield. 
From a point, A. within the grounds, projeel a ti 
line oul into I and at a point, B, 154 teel Erom ] 

rV lay off In tnd B I) at right angles to the line 

A B; then, with B a radius, 

cutting tin- lines B •• , (i - I* l* 

at 11 and B E at [. Draw lines P G G E, E H, and II F, 
which said lines shall be tin- containing lines of the Dia 
mond or Infield 

The Catcher's Lines. 
With F • r .'»n<l 10 fed radiu 

ittina Line F \ al L, and 
L M and L I > al right ai 
ul Erom F A than 



to F A, and 

10 f. 



<lr;tu 

• inui 



25 



The Foul Lines. 

From the intersection point, F, continue 
RULE 4. the straight lines F G and F II until they 
intersect the lines L M and L (), and then 
from the points G and 11 in the opposite direction until 
they reach the boundary lines of the ground, and said lines 
shall be clearly visible from any part of the diamond, and 
no wood or other hard substance shall be used m the con- 
struction of such lines. 

The Players' Lines. 

With F as center and 50 feet radius, 
RULE 5. describe arcs cutting lines F O and F M 
at P and Q ; then, with F as center again 
and 75 feet radius, describe arcs cutting F (i and F H at 
R and S; then, from the points P, Q, 1\ and S draw lines 
at right angles to the lines F (), F M. F G and F 11, and 
Continue the same until they intersect at the points T 

and \V. 

The Coachers' Lines. 

With R and S as centers and 15 feet 

RULE 6. radius, describe arcs cutting the lines R W 

and S T at X and Y and from the points 

X and Y draw lines parallel with the lines F H and F G, 

and continue same put to the boundary lines of the ground. 

The Three-Foot Line. 
With F as a center and 45 feet radius, 
RULE 7. describe an are cutting the line F G at I, and 
n-Min 1 to the distance of three feet draw a 
line at right angles to F C>. and marked point j; then from 
point 2 draw a line parallel with the line F G to a point 
three feet beyond the point G, marked .^; then from the 
p ( ,im j draw a line at right angles to line 2, 3, back to 
and intersecting with F G, and from thence back along the 
line ( « F to point 1. 

The Batsman's Lines. 
I )n either side of the line A F B de- 
RULE 8. scribe two parali six feet long and 

four feet wide (marked X and 9), their 
longest sale being parallel with the line A F B, their 
distance apart being six inches added to each end of the 
length f the diagonal of the square within the angle F, 
m( f the center of their length hem- on said diagonal. 



RULE 9. 



26 

The Pitcher's Plate. 

S» TION i With poin r and 

60.5 feet as radius, describe an are cutting 
the line F B at line 4, and draw a line 5. 6, 



HIV. 1111V. 1 1J U.I I1IIV, £f, .IMU KlIilW t\ 1IIIV 3, 

ig through point 4 and extending \2 inches on either 
side ol line F IS; then with line 5, 6, cribe a 

parallelogram 24 inches bj inches, in which shall be lo- 
cated the pitcher's plate. 

SEC, 2. The pitcher's plate shall not be more than 15 
inches higher than the base lines or the home plate, which 
shall be level with the surface of the held, and the slope 
from the pitcher's plate to every base line and the home 
plate shall be gradual 



The Bases. 

ion 1. Within the angle F, describe 

RULE 10. a five-sided figure. tu< "t which 

mall co i lien le with the Hi ind F H 

to the extent oi 12 inches each, thence parallel with the 

line F B 8 l 2 inches to the points X and Y, a straight line 
between which, \J inches, will form the front oi the home 
<<r plate. 

Within the angle I and II describe 

squares, whose sides are 15 inches in length, two of such 

sides of which squares shall lie along the : :: and 

Cm [, G I and I li, I II and II I\ which squares ^hall he 

the I ■ .ud and third I pectively 

The Home Base a' F and the Pitcher's 

RULE 11. Plate at 4 must each be oi whitened rubber, 

and so fixed in the ground as to be even 

with its surface. 

The First Base at <». the Second 

RULE 12. at E, ami the Third Base at H m 

1 white :■ d with soft ma- 

il and securely fastened m place it the points sped/ted 
in Rule 10. 





d he hn> d in Rules \, \, 5. ( >, 7- 




RULE 13. and 8 must be marked with lime, chalk or 




her white ma1 ily distinguishable 


from the ground or gi 



27 



The Ball. 

Section i. The ball must weigh not less 
RULE 14. .than five nor more than live and one-quar- 
ter ounces avoirdupois, and measure not 
than nine nor more than mm- and one -quarter inches 
in circumference. The Spalding National League Ball or 
the Reach American League Ball must be used m all 
games played under these rules. 

Two regulation balls of the make adopted by 
the league of which the contesting clubs are members, 
shall be delivered by the home club to the umpire at or 
ire the hour for "the commencement of a championship 
game. If the ball placed in play be batted or thrown out 
of the grounds or into one or the stands for spectators 
or in the judgment of the umpire, become unfit for play 
from any cause, the umpire shall at once deliver the alter- 
nate ball to the pitcher and another legal ball shall be sup- 
plied to him, SO that he shall at all tunes have in his con- 
trot one or more alternate balls, Provided, however, that 
all balls batted or thrown out of the ground or into a stand 
shall when returned to the field be given into the custody 
ot the umpire immediately and become alternate balls and 
so long \s he has in his possession :wo or more alternate 
balls, he shall not call for a new ball to replace one that has 
gone out of play. The alternate balls shall become the ball 
in play in the'order in which they were delivered to the 

mnpirc. , ,• i • r i 

She. ?. Immediately Upon the delivery to him ot the 

alternate ball by the umpire, the pitcher shall take his posi- 
tion and on the call of "Play." by the umpire, it shall be- 
come the ball in play. Provided, however, that play shall 
nut be resumed with the alternate ball when a fair hatted 
ball or a ball thrown by a fielder goes out of the ground 
or jj .,,i , nr jp until the base-runners have 

ipleted the circuit of the bases unless compelled to stop 
., i{ ,,,. tHird base in compliance with a ground 



The Spalding League Ball has been adopted by the National League 
for the past thirty years and is used in all the League contests. It has 
;dso been adopted hy the majority of other professional leagrues and by 
practically all the colleges. 

For junior clubs (clubs composed of boys under 16 years of age) we 
recommend them touse (he Spalding Boys League Bal. and that games 
Saved by junior clubs with this ball wjl eount as legal games the same 
as if played with the Official League Ball. 



28 

Discolored or Damaged Balls. 
Sec. 4 In the event ot a ball being intentionally dis- 
colored by rubbing it with th, any 
player except the pitcher, or otherwise damaged by any 
Player, the umftre ihall upon appeal by tl in ol 
the oppositr M <fe, forthwith demand the return of that ball 
and substitute lor ,i another legal ball, as hereinbel 
described, and impose a fine of $5.00 .,11 the offending pla 

Home Club to Provide Balls. 
St. . 5 ] n every game the balls played with shall be 
furnished by the home club, and the "last • ball 

become the property of the winning club. Each ball shall 
De enclosed in a papei vhich must be sealed with 

U fu *i u e Secrctar y of the League and bear his certifi- 
cate tnatne has examined, measured and weighed the ball 
contained therein and that it is of th- required standard in 
an respects The seal shall not be brol 
except in the pre , 1H , ,,, th( . contesting 

teams after "Play ' ha 

Reserve Balls on Field. 
Sec 6 The i lonK . dul) shal! h;ivr a1 /en reg _ 

ulation bails on the field during each championsh 
on the call of the umpire. 

The Bat. 

' be bal mu tmd, not over two and 

thre< fourth inch meter at the thick- 

part, nor more than ;. 

; [' : d around Of 

a granulai applied I 

Number of Players in a Game. 
I he pi. 1 
d in a . nine 

in number, one of whom shall 

; . \:. ''T m , ' 

Positions of the Players. 



RULE 15. 



RULE 16. 



RULE 17. 



Th 



th 



pla. 



. , . t 






ug 



■ 



29 



ilx- bat, must t;ike his position as defined in Rules o and 
and the catcher ihum be within the lines of his position 
as defined in Rule 3 and within to feel of home base, wh 
ever the pitcher delivers the ball to the bat. 

Must Not Mingle With Spectators. 

Players in uniform shall not be permit 
RULE 18, ted to occui in the stands, or to 

mingle with the spectators. 

Uniforms of Players. 

Every club shall adopt two uniforms for 
RULE 19. its playi to be worn in games at 

home and the other in games abroad, and 
the suits of each of the uniforms of a team shall conform 
in color and style. No player who shall attach anything 
to the sole or heel of his shoe other than the ordinary base 
ball shoe plate-, or who shall appear in a uniform not con- 
fon the suits of th< other members ot his team, 

shall be permitted to take part in a game. 

Size and Weight of Gloves, 

The catcher or first baseman may wear a 
RULE 20. glove or mitt of any size, shape or weight. 

Every other player is restricted to the 
of a glove or mitl weighing not over ro ounces and meas- 
uring not over 14 inches around the palm. 

Players' Benches. 
Section i. Players' benches must be fur- 
RULE 21. nished l>v the home club and placed upon 
a j,, the ground not less than tv. 

h five (25) feet i ' Mu ' surh 

bench shall be for the exclusive use of the visiting team 
and the other for the exdush ' the home tram. 

Each bench must I 'I with a n ol and closed at the 

ba.-k and each em e, however, not more than six 

(6) •;,„!, • wide may be left under the rooi for ventilation. 
-Ml players and substitutes of the side at bat must be 
seated on their l 1" ,ll( ] batsman, b 

runners and -urh 

rnnh , ,. Under no circum tances shall the umpire permit 
any person except the players and substitutes in uniform 
an d ,i, ( of the tram entitled to its exclusive 

1 -nch. 



30 

Penalty for Violation. 

xyi !" ition 

til imm« 6rder 

be 
" " '" " nl " l>i nol obeyed within one minutt 

;; ;;\'; "i 1 ;'?'''''; p ' | """"' i> i.v ,J,\- 

I ,r,„ , "," »"'»<"<■■ 

he offending player or p ,„ ,„. ,|,.,,„. r ,,, frilII1 

tortnwitn leave the playing field. 

A Regulation Game. 

rule ?> ;n ' ""isl be i 

«=£. mei later tl. 

has h-„l „■ : "' ~ UaV 

& termini 

in S' runs in nine 

""s "^ ll '",',","' gh) fnninj 

th e '.;-■„ {the , a < ''■ ll in the ninth inning si 

tne winning run before the third man is out 
„/,/ fine gam, the um/nt unt 

other ch* puts 

patrons ■•> players m / ' 

Extra-Inning Games. 

RULE ?i 

ran. ,l,. , .1 d Until ' 

run 
iter the ninth. 

Drawn Games. 

RULE 24 
24. 

Plav in 

if i 



31 



RULE 25 

b 



Called Games. 

If the umpire calls a game in accordance 
with Rule 22, Set Hon 3, al any time after five 
innings have been completed, tin* score 
of the lasl equal innings played, excepttkat 



shall be that 

it the ond at bal shall have scored in an unequa 

number of innings, or before the completion of th 
finished inning, at least one run more than the hide fust at 
bat, the score of the game shall be the total number of runs 
each team has made. 



RULE 26. 



Forfeited Games. 

A forfeited game shall he declared by the 
umpire ' of the club nut in fault, in 



the following ea 
SECTION I. It the team of a club fail to appear upon the 
field. .„• being UOOn the held, re:' 

which eduled or assigned, within five minutes after 

the umpir. at the hour lor tin- beginning 

of the game, unless such delay "• appearing, or in com 

tnencing the game, be unavoidable. 

Sec. 2. If, after the game has begun, one side refuse to 
continue to play, unless the game has been suspended or 
terminated by the umpire. 

Fter play I the umpire, 

ide fails to resume pla: ! "' minute alter the 

umpin led "Play." 

,. If a team employ tactics palpably designed to 

the game. 

[f a ft< r warning by the umpire, any one oi the 
ime be- wilfully and persistently violated. 

6 It the order for I 'Val Oi a pla;.' 

authorized by Rules 21, $ ;il " 1 "»• be no1 obe y ed mthm 

ojh minute. , . . 

; | f> ], ., the removal oi players From the 

•.vim- by the umpire, or for anj cause, there be less than 
nine players on either team. 

Sj. t 8 li when two games are scheduled to he played 

in one afternoon, tin- second game In- not commenced 

within ten nm -"• ° ,! "' completion oi the 

•| I,,- umpire oi ih- tne shad he the 

timekeeper. ... , 

.,,, mnpn forfeited, 

, port thereoi to ii, | 



32 






of the League within h ir hours thereafter. Hnw- 

, a I'ailnr part of the umpin to so notifj the 

t the validity of hi \ award of the 
game \>- ire. 

No Game. 

"\. shall be declared by the um- 

RULE 27. ptre ii he terminates play in accordanct with 
Rule jj. Sec, 3, before nve innings arc com- 
pleted by each team. Provided, however, that if the club 
>nd at bat shall have made more runs at the end of 
its fourth inning than the club first at bat has made in five 
completed in: r initiated, the umpire 

shall award the game to the club having mad< ater 

number of runs, and it shall count yame in the 

championship record. 

Substitutes. 

: • <{\uy< d 

RULE 28. to have presenl i ! during a ch 

pionship game a 
stitute players in uniform, conforming to th< " ril 

by their team-mat rrv out I of this 

hall 
upy the held in any inning i 
Sa .2, Ki 
game take the pi; his 

team's batting order, but hom he 

shall not thereafter participate in t! 
'. 

run 

pt by ili' »ther 

:il. 

Choice of Innings — Fitness of Field for Play. 

The 
RULE 29. Mi,, | ,; | UD( wh- 

the sole judge of the fitness of the ground 
for begii 
call 

ntn« 

call 

and in pi 



^^■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■HHQkNftJ 



^^^^t^^ter • 



w^ 



33 

THE PITCHING RULES. 
Delivery of the Ball to the Bat. 

Preliminary to pitching, the pitcher shall 
RULE 30. take his position facing the batsman with 
both feet squarely on the ground and in 
front of tin- pitcher'.-, plate; and m the ad of delivering the 
ba I to the hat lu- must keep one foot in contact with die 
pitcher's plate defined in Rule a He shall no1 raise cither 
loot until in the act of delivering the ball to the bat, nor 
make more than one Step in such delivery. 

A Fairly Delivered Call. 
A fairly delivered ball is a ball pitched 
RULE 31. or thrown to the bat by the pitcher while 
standing in his position and facing the bats- 
man that i -asses over any portion of the home base, before 
touching the ground, not lower than the batsman's knee, 
nor higher than his shoulder. For every such fairly deliv- 
ered ball the umpire shall call one strike. 

An Unfairly Delivered Ball. 

An unfairly delivered ball is a ball de- 
RULE 32. livered to the bat by the pitcher while 

tiding in hi.- position and facing the b 
man that does not pass over any portion ol the home b 

the batsman's shoulder and knees, or that toiwfies 
the ground before passing home base, unless struck at by the 
batsman. For every unfairly delivered ball the umpire 
shall call one ball. 

Delaying the Game. 

. (>N l If. after the batsman be Stand- 
RULE 33. Ing iu In- proper position ready to s 

a pitched ba" 



the ball 



be thrown by the 
pitcher to any player" other than the catcher when in 
the catcher's lines and within to feet oi the home base 

■ in an attempi to retire a base runner), each lull so 
thrown shall I" called a ''all. 

Sec, a. The umpire shall call a ball on the pitcher each 
time he delays the game by fading to deliver the ball to 
the batsman for a longer period fan M seconds, excel* 
that at the commencement of each inning, or when a pitch 
er relieves another, the pitcher may occupy one minute .,. 
delivering not to exceed five balls to the catcher or an 
infielder, during which time play shall be suspended. 






34 







Balking. 

A balk shall 

RULE 34. / - made by the 

pitcher while in position to deliver the ball 

\n the bal without d< I or to throv to firsl b 

when occupied b> a b; ompleting 
throw. 

Ski. j. Throwing the ball by the p to 

catch the base runner without stepping directly toward 
such base in the act of making Mich thr< 

St< i! to the bat by the pitcher 

while eitln the pitcher's plate. 

Sec. 4. Any deli ball to the bat by the pitcher 

while he is not facing 

Sec. 5. Any motion in d< the ball to the bat by 

bile not in th ned by R 

Sec 6. Holding of the ball by the » n 

7. Making any motion to pitch while standing in his 

tion without having the ball in his ■'• 

SEC 8. Making any moduli of the arm, 

body the pitcher habitually mak- d of deli\ 

without imme< he ball to the bafc 

Sec. <). Deli the ball to the hat when the catcher 

outside the lines of tie 
■ I in Rul 
If the 1 tply with the requir< m< 

n of this rule, the umpire shall call a "balk." 

Dead Ball. 

A dead ball is a b - i 

RULE 35. 

man. that t< 
man tanding in his position, 

or that I 

: the 
umpire while he is on foul 

Ball Not In Play. 
RULE 36. 



35 



Block Balls. 

\ blo< tted or thrown 

RULE $7. ball that is touched, stopped or handled by 
a person no1 engaged in the game. 
Whenever a block occurs the umpire shall de- 
clare n and base runners may run the bases withoul liabil- 
ity to be put oul until the ball has been returned to and 
by tlu- pitcher in his position. 

rson ivt engaged m the game should 

ball, or throw or kick it 

m<l the reach of the fielders, the umpire shall call 

"Time" and require each base runner to stop at the base 

touched by him until the hall be returned to the pitcher 

in his position and th< umpire shall have called "I lay. 

THE BATTING RULES. 
The Batsman's Position. 
|:. ir!l player of the side al bat shall 
RULE 38. come the batsman and must take his p 

n within the batsman's lines (as denned 
in Rule B) ra th< order that his nam-, appears in his team's 

batting list. 

The Order of Batting. 

The batting order of each team must he 
delivered before the game by its captain to 
,,„. nm|lin . w ho shall submit it to the m- 
lion of the captain of the other side. rhe batting or Lei- 
delivered to the umpire must be followed throughout the 
game unless a player ' another, m which 

StStemua take the place m the batting order 
of the retired pla 

The First Batsman in an Inning. 

the first strike r in 
RULE 40. each inning shall be the batsman whose 
me follows that of the last man who 
completed his "time at bat" in the preceding inning. 
Players Belong on Bench. 
When a side the ba< its pi 

RULE 41. must imme< , <"**? 

fined in Rule 

and remain there until th cep! 

n called to the bat or I 



RULE 39. 



«4 & 



36 

Reserved for Umpire, Catcher and Batsman. 

'he 
RULE 42. batsman, shall occupy any portion of the 
rithin th« defined 

in Rule 3. The triangular space back of the bonn 

• ?ed for I i >f the umpire, and 

batsman, and the umpire must prohibil any player of the 

side "at bat" from crossing im< while the 

is in the ban nig 

'.on them while standing in their p 

Fielder Has Right of Way. 

The players of the ride at bat 
RULE 43. speedily abandon tlwir bench and hasl 
nother part of the fii Id when b; 

intf upon or near it they or any of them would tnterf 
with a fielder in an attempt to catch or handle a thr 
or a batted ball. 

THE BATTING RULES. 

A Fair Hit. 

A fair bit is a I ; ball that 

RULE 44. ir grout n home and 

Cid third 
or that 19 on fair ground inding fo 

or third base or I 
the umpire or a pl{ ■ mid. 

A Foul Hit. 

• ail hit i- ball that 

RULE 45. , ,m<- and 

that 
boun 
falls on foul trrr:' - third !».• 

the und. 



A Foul Tip. 
RULE 46. 



VHMI 



37 

A Bunt Hit. 
A hunt bit is a legally batted ba 



no1 



RULE 47. swung at, but mel with the bal and tapped 
slowly within the infield by the batsman. 
If the attempt to bunt result in a Foul not legally caught, a 
strike shall he called by the umpire. 



Balls Batted Outside the Ground. 

Section i. When a hatted ball passes 
RULE 48. outside the ground or into a stand the um- 
pire shall decide it fair or foul according to 
where il disappears from the umpire's view. 

Sec ! A fair batted bail that goes over the fence or 
kand shall entitle the batsman to a home run unless 
it should pass oul of the ground or into a stand at a Jess 
distance than two hundred and thirty-five (235) feet from 
the home base, in which case the batsman shall be entitled 
to two bases only. The point at which a nice or stand 
is less than 2^5 feet from the home base shall be plainly 
indicated by a white or black sign or mark for the um- 
pire's guidance. 

Strikes. 

A strike is: .,,,,, , . u 

49, ,,, N j. A pitched ball struck at by 

the batsman without its touching his hat ; or, 

fair ball legally delivered by the pitcher at 
which the batsman does not strike 

Skc 3, A foul hit hall not caught on I 
hatsm;,n has two strife , . . . c . 

SBC. 4. An at!< -nipt to bunt which results m a foul not 

lr Sk!- ^Adtched ball, at which the batsman strikes but 

u<\ which touch.,, any part of his person. 

6, A foul tip, held by the catcher, while standing 
within the lines of his position. 



Foul Strike. 

\ "Foul Strike" is a ball bitted by the 

RULE 50. batsman when either or both of hi 

upon the ground outside the lines of the 
batsman's position. 



RULE 



fly unless the 



38 



When Batsman is Out. 

The batsman is out : 
RULE 51. rion *■ If he fail to ta! ition 

. tin order in which his name 
appears on the batting list unless the error be discovered 
and the pi -nan replace him before a time "at bal 

irded, in whirl, ad strikes called must 

ounted in the time "at bat" of the proper batsman. 
But only the proper hat-man shall be declared out, and 
no runs shall be e of any act 

of the improper batsman. 11 sot be 

enforced unless the out be re the hall he de- 

liverer! to the succeeding hat-man. Should the batsman 
declared out under this section be the third hand nut and 

ide he thereby pu1 out, the proper batsman in the i 
inning shall be the player who would b hat 

had the players been put out by ordinary play in the pre- 
ceding inning. 

hi- position within one minute 
•!h d for tin- ha' -man. 
Sec. 3. If he make a foul hit other than a foul tip, a 
fined in Rule the ball be momentarily held by a 

fielder h tching the ground; provided, it be not 

caught in a I or other part 

of his uniform, or strik* some object other than a f 
ght 
1 1 he make a foul sti 

inder the catcher from fielding 
or throwing the hall by stepping outside the lines of the 
in any v. 
with thai 

aimer. 
. on him by the umpire, unless two 
men 

ec. 7. If, ill touch 

any run 

ribed in 

t and - 
: . In- 
hit a fly ball, Other ti in he handled 

I Int. 



..^^.^-.J'.:.^. :. 



39 

. io. If he steps from one batsman's boa to the other 
after the pitcher has taken his positi 

BASE RUNNING RULES. 

Legal Order of Bases. 

The Base Runner must touch each base 
RULE 52. m legal order, viz., First, Second, Third 
and Home Bases; and when obliged to re- 
turn while the ball is in play, must retouch the base or 
bases in >rder. He can only acquire the right to a 

• by touching it. before having been put out, and shall 
then be entitled to hold Mich base until he has legally 
touched the next base in order, or has been legally forced 
to vacate it for a succeeding base runner. However, no 
runner shall run to count in the game ahead 

runner preceding him in the batting order, if 
there be such preceding base runner who has not been put 
OUt in that inning. 

When the Batsman Becomes a Base-Runner. 

The batsman becomes a base runner: 
RULE 53. [nstantly after he mai. 

fair hit. 
Instantly after "Four Halls have been called by 

the umpire. _ ., „ , 

Instantly after 'Three Stink..- have. been de- 
clared bv the umpire. 

Sec 4. If. without making any attempt to strike at the 
ball, his person or clothing be hit by a pitched ball unl< 
in the -pinion of tin umpire, he P^nly iuaU( - no effor4 
et out of the way of the pitched ball. 

Sec 5. If the catcher interfere with him m or prevent 
him from stri pitched bah- 

Sec. 6. If a fair hit ball strike the person orclothmg of 
the umpire or a base runner on fairground. 

Entitled to Bases. 
The base runner shah be entitled, with 
RULE 54. out liability to be put out, to advance a b 
in tin- follow 
Section i If, while the hat swan, he becomes a ba 
runner by reason of -four balls" or for bein* hit / 
pitched ball, or for being interfered with by the catcher 

Striking at a pitched hail. 






[ 



40 

Sec. 2. If the umpire awards to a succeeding batsman a 
base on four balls, or for being hit by a pitched ball, or 
being interfered with by the catcher in striking at a pitched 
ball and the base runner be thereby forced to vacate the 
base held by him. 

. 3. I i the umpire call a "Balk." 

Sec. 4. If a ball delivered by the pitcher pass the catcher 
and tottch the umpire Ot any fence or building within 
ninety (90) feet of the home ba 

Sec. 5. If he be prevented from making a base by the 
obstruction Of a fielder, unless the latter have the ball in 
his hand ready to touch the base runner. 

Sec. 6. If the fielder stop or catch a batted ball with 
his cap, glove or any part of his uniform, while detached 
from its proper place wu his person. 



Returning to Bases. 

runner shall return to In 
RULE 55. without liability to be put out: 

Section 1. If the umpire declares any 
foul not legally caught. 

Sec. 2. If the umpire declares a foul strike. 
Sec. 3. If the umpire declares a dead ball, unless it be 
also the fourth unfair ball, and he be therein' forced to take 
the next base, as provided in Rule 54, Section 2. 
Sec. 4. If the person or clothing of the umpire inter- 
with the catcher in an attempt to throw or the umpire 
be struck by a bad thrown by the catcher or other fielder 
to intercept a base runner. 

Sec. 5. If a pitched ball at which the batsman strikes 
but misses, touch any part of the batsman's pei 

6. In any and all of these cases the base runner is 
n<»t required to touch the intervening returning to 

the ba fttitled to. 

When Base Runners are Out. 
The base runner is out : 
RULE 56. Section l If, alter three strikes have 
been declared against him while the batsman, 
the third strike ball be not legally caught and he plainly 
inder th- from fielding the ball. 

It", having made a fair hit while batsman, 
fair hit ball be momentarily held by a rubier before touch- 
ing the ground or anj objed other than a fielder; pro 



WHm ...„-.,;-" 



41 

vided, it be not caught in a fielder's hat, cap, protector, 
pocket or other part of his uniform. 

Sec. 3, If, when the umpire has declared "Three 
Strikes" on him while the batsman, the third strike ball 
be momentarily held by a fielder before touching the 
ground,; provided, it be not caught in a fielder's cap, 
protector, pocket or other part of his uniform, or touch 
some object other than a fielder before being caught. 

4. If, after three strikes or a fair hit, he be touched 
with the ball in the hand of a fielder before he shall have 
touched first base. 

Sec. 5. If, after three strikes or a fair hit, the ball be 
securely held by a fielder while touching first base with 
any part of his "person before such base runner touch first 
base. 

Sec. 6, If, in running the las! half of the distance from 
home base to first base, while the ball is being fielded to 
first base, he run outside the three fool lines, as defined 
in Rule 7, unless he do so to avoid a fielder attempting to 
field a batted ball. 

Sue, 7, If, in running from first to second base, from 
ond to third ba^e, or from third to home base, he run 
more than three feet from a direct line between a base 
and the next one in regular or reverse order to avoid be- 
ing touched by a ball in the hands of a fielder, But in 
a fielder be occupying a base runner's proper path in 
attempting to field a batted ball, then the base runner shall 
run out of direct line to the next base and behind said 
fielder and shall n-t be declared oul f..r so doing. 

Sec. 8. If he fail t<» avoid a fielder attempting to field 
a batted ball, in the manner described in Sections 6 and 7 
of tin mi, . or in any way obstruct a fielder in attempting 
to field a batted ball, or intentionally interfere with a 
thrown ball; provided, thai if two or more fielders attempt 
to field a batted ball, and the base runner come m contact 
with one "i- more o\ them, the umpire shall determine 
whirl, fielder is entitled to the benefit oi this rule, and 
I noj d.vidr the base runner out for coming m contact 
with a fielder other than the one the umpire determines 
to be entitled to field such batted ball. 

g If at any time while the ball is in play, he be 
touched by the ball in the hands of a fielder, unless some 
pari of : n be touching the base he is entitled to 

ipy; provided, however, that the ball be held by the 
fielder after touching him, unless the base runner delib- 
erately knock it out of his hand. 



42 



[o. If, when a fair or foul hit lnll (other than a 
foul tip as defined in fctule .;■'>> be legall) caught by a 
ueh hail be legally htid by a neider on the base 
ipied by \\n base runner when such ball was batted, 
or the base runner be touched with the bah 1 in the hands 
of a fielder, b retouch such base atter such fair or 

foul hit ball was so caught ; provided, thai the base runner 
shall not be out in such case, it', after the ball was legally 

I to the hat In the pitcher 
before the fielder hold it on said base, or touch the base 
runner out with it ; hut if the base runner, in attempting 
to reach a base, detach it from it- fastening before being 
touched nr forced out, he shall be <\ 

ii. If, when the hat-man becomes a base runner, 
tlie first base, or the Ersl and second bases, or the first, 

•ikI and third bas< upied, any base runn< r 

occupying a base shall cease to I"- entitled to hold it. and 
may be put out at the next base in the same manner as in 
running in first b >uched with the ball in 

the hands oi a fielder at any time before any base runner 
following him in the hatting- order be put out, unless the 
umpire should decide the hit of the batsman to be an in* 
field fly. 

u. If a fair hit hall strike him before touching 
a h< ", in such case, n<> base shall be run unless 

necessitated by the hat -man becoming a bas< runner, but 
BO run shall Other base runner put "lit 

until the umpire puts the ball hack into play. 

i . i.}. If. when advancing ha- ced to return 

lib the bail is in play, he fail to touch the 
intervening base or b. . in the regular 01 

order, as the case may be, he ma) be put out by the ball 
being held by a fielder on any base he failed to touch, or 
by being touched by the ball in the hands of a fielder 
in ti in running to fij i ba e . provided, 

thai be out in such case if the 

hall be drH\ the bat by the pitcher before the 

r hold ii "ii said base or touch tl runner with it. 

14. If, when the umpire call "Play," after thi 
. h< fail to return to and touch the : 
he occupied me" was called before touching the 

rovidect the base runner shall not !>■• out, in 
1 be delivered to the bat by the 
ler bold it on said ba 1 or touch 
h it. 






■■■■■i 



■PHHMPB 



^.^ 



Vi 



43 

15. // :<'//// ^//f- or no one out and a base rum 
third base \ the batsman interferes with a play being made 
at Home plate. 

Sec. [<3. // Jir pass a base runner who is taught A i 
two bases, he shall be declared out immediately upon pass 
mg the preceding base runner. 

Overrunning First Base. 
17. The base runner in running I base may 

overrun said base after touching it in passing without in- 
curring liability to be out for being off said base, pro- 
vided he return a1 once and retouch the base* after which 
he ma\ be put out as at any other base* If. after over- 
running first base, he turn in the direction of or attempt 
f<> run to second base, before returning to first base, he- 
shall for frit Mich exemption from liability to be put out 
• x. h", before two hands arc out and while third 
, upied, • itioned near that base shall 

run in the direction of home base on or near the base line 
while a fielder is making <>r trying to make a play on a 
batted ball not caught on the fly, of on a thrown ball, and 
thereby draws a throw to home base, the base runner 
titled "to third base shall be declared out by the umpire 
W the cnaeluT's interference with and prevention of the 
legitimate play, 

Sec. iq. if one or more members of the team at hat 
stand or tl or around a base for which a I 

runner is trying, thereby confusing the fielding side and 
adding to the difficulty of making such play, the base run- 
ner shall be declared out for the ml of his team 
mate or train mat 
Si-.< . 20. If he touch home base before a base runner pi 
tg him in the batting order, If there be such preceding 
runner, lose his right to third base 

When Umpire Shall Declare an Out. 

Xhe umpire shall declare the batsman or 
RULE 57. base runner out, without waiting for an ap- 
peal for 'iieh decision, in all cases wh 
such player be put out in accordance with any oi these 
rule tions 13 and 17 of Rule 

Coaching Rules. 
The coacher shall be restricted to coach- 
RULE 58. ing th. base runner only, and shall not 
remarks except to the base runner, 
and thru only in word, of assistance and direction in run- 



44 



mn ? He shall not, by words or signs, incite or try 

to incite the spectators to demonstratioi 

language which will in any manner tlect 

upon a player tte club, the umpire or I 

tators. Not more than two coachers, who must be pla 
m the uniform oi the team ai bat, shall be allowed to oc- 
cupy the space between the players' and thecoachei 
one near first and the other near third base, to coach I 
runner. If there be more than the legal number of coach- 

or this rule D€ violated in any the captain of 

I lc °gp° may call the attention of the ampin 
tne offense* and thereupon the umpire must order the il- 
legal coacher or i to the bench, and rder 
be not obeyed within one minute, the umpire shall 

F5.00 againsl each offendinj and upon a 

repetition oi the lending 

shall be debarred from furth.-r participation in the game, 
and shall Leave the playi forthwith. 

The Scoring of Runs. 
One run shall be scored every tta 

KULE 59. base runner, after having legally touched 

the first three bases, shall legally tout h the 

home ' ii are put out ; provided, I 

be reach home on or during a play in which 
the third man be forced out or be put out b- iiing 

a run shall not count. A 

runner legally loses the right to the I 
id is thereby obliged to ad, 
tair hit ball i By, 

UMPIRE AND HIS DUTIES. 
Power to Enforce Decisions. 
'I li.- umpire is th< I the 

II l it i f l m r.-d • 

tie Jhall have the . :!;l n 

do " r oniif | whu-i, m his judgmenl is 

ruies, and to mil: 
hereinafter pn 



RULE 60. 



RULE 61. 



I here shall 

the ground thai be 

...i, .i i ,u 



RULE 63. 



45 

or out, a pitched ball a strike or ball, or on arty other 
Play involving accuracy of judgment, and nodeciston ren 
dered by him .1,,!! !• ■• « i.'< h -' [ 1 ",.' K ^u e 

rinced thai it is in violation of one •>> *«* «™ <--. n « 
captain shall alone have the right to protest ag. uns t a 
decision and seek its revet '•'"» tli:,t ,l 1S ln con 

fttct with a section of these rules. 

Must Not Question Decisions. 

Under no circumstances shall a captain 
RULE 62. or p"ay« dispute the accuracy of jhe um- 
pire's judgment and decision on a play. 

Clubs Can Not Change Umpire. 

The umoire van not be changed during a 

of the field be incapacitated from service bj injury or 
Penalties for Violations of the Rules. 

axitt - di 

nt of the ;;|:!V " v 

Umpire to Report Violations of the Rules. 

The umpire ^ "%$ '^mthe 
RULE * SSSe.'SrW to^e 7reifi e a report of 
the penalty inflicted and the cause theretor. 

" ^mediately upon bring r mf ormedhy^he 

RULE 66. umpire that a fine ha ' ^ 

any manager, raptam or P^ y ^ ^ nf 
dent shall notify the , ' . '.;',.,„ ,„- „,, failure of 

which he is a member; :"»<• " . '\,,.,,, :irv f tin- League 

"" fined t" Pay "'"",-,., In- "aft. r ....tic-, he 

'•' "' U ' ^coating ' anv championship 
debarred from ^jSTtaich during the pt 
game or from sitting on a I' 1 - 1 r . ,, ,,,„. |„. paid. 
i championship game until men 



16 

Rui p at - ^ ll(,,i nred 

r an 

or umpire J] within 

oui hou 

. irticulars. 

Warning to Captains. 

RULP ro - ' ,R ' um P»re shall i 

h6 ' ii-1 in thi 

"y and impartially 

r n ;; Illlir,r j j; : n win 



RULE 69. 



On Ground Rules. 

tin,, 

Mill 



RULE 70. 



Official Announcements. 



Suspension of Play. 

RULE 71 



•17 

th« ink "i- other extraordinary 

circui 

Call of Time. 

In suspending play from any legal 
RULE 72. the umpire shall cal] "Time"; when he c 

"Time, play shall be suspended until he 
,;,. and during the interim i shall 



rails "I 
be put 
not be 



out, base'be" run*or "run be scored, "time" shall 
.| b3 the umpire until .the ball be held by the 
while standing in his position. 



Decisions on Balls and Strikes. 



RULE 73. 



Pu- impire shall call and count as a 
any unfair ball delivered by the 



and count 

er any portion 



pitcher to the batsman. He shall also call 
..,!-■" any fairly delivered ball which 
(I1 ,v portion of the home base, and within the 
defined in Rule 31. whether strucr 
ai or nol by the batsman; or a foul uv which is 
by the catcher standing within the Lines o bis positior 
withh r wlnrh after bem 

... , ... . -i ,i... -..,11 ni the hntsmnn 



in Rule 31, whether struck 
tight 
•li«' , ,-: ( r]'h,.r"o:indin'u' within the Lines of bis position, 
the home ba tfhich, aI,tT 1>rin - 

• and" not hit. strike the person oi the batsman: 
or when the ball be bunted foul by the batsman; or any 



IOUI in "« ./..1,'w.,.,. , . ...... 

foul Int'hall nnt"can^ht on the fly unless the batsman has 

th ' 

b;ill" l 

be assigned, his duties 



:augh1 on ine ny uiiwsa «« y"-™ , T 
trite, provided, however, that a pitched ball shall 

tnke by the urn- 



not be calied' or counted a "ball" or 

pire until it h the iMiur plate 

If but <>nc umpire 



If but <>nr umpire uc d»oi«i.^, ■ - — 
RULE 74. and jurisdiction shall extend to all points. 
and he shall be permitted to take his stand 
in any part of the field that in his opinion will best enable 

him • 

Field Rules. 

allowed upon 

RULE 75. part oi 

£une except th * uniform, the 

uch officers of the .law 
. H1 uniform, and such watchmen oi the 
home club as may be necessary to preserve the peace. 

captain or player shall ad- 

RULE 76. dr< 

f n repli ! " r information about 

tin- • me. 



48 

Every club shall furnish sufficient police 
RULE 77. farce to preset"* upon its own 

grounds, and in the event of a crowd enter- 
ing the field during the progress oi a game, and interfer- 
ing with the play in any manner, the visiting club may 
refuse to play until the field be cleared. If the field be not 
cleared within 15 minutes thereafter, the visiting club may 
claim and shall he entitled to the game by a score of nine 
runs to none (no matter what number of innings has 
played). 

General Definitions. 

"Play* 5 is the order »>f the umpire to be- 
RULE 78. gin the game or to resume it after its sus- 
pension. 

"Time" i 1 - the order of the umpii 
RULE 79. pend play. Such suspension must not 
tend b< yond the day. 

"Game" is the announcement of the inn- 
RULE 80. pire that the game is terminated. 

"An imiin.tr" is the term at bat ol the 
RULE 81. nine players representing a Hub in a game 
and is completed when three of such play- 
;i ive been legally put out. 

"A Time at Bat" is the* term at bat of a 
RULE 82. batsman. It begins when he takes his po- 
sition, and continues until he is put out 
or \y base runner. But a time at bat shall n»»t b- 

charged against a batsman who is awarded first base by the 
umpire for being hit by a pitched ball, or on Called balls, or 

when he mal rifice hit, or for inieri : the 

C(iU her. 

"Legal" or "Legally" signil [uired 

RULE 83. by these rah 

THE SCORING RULES. 

To promote uniformity in scoring cham- 
RULE 84. pionship the following instructions 

1 stions and definitions 

made for tie d t«» 

make all scores in accordance therewith. 



*M». 



49 

The Batsman's Record. 

nix i. The first Item in the tabu- 

RULE 85. latcd score, after the players name and 

position, shall be tbe number of times he 

has been at bat daring the game, bill the exceptions made 

n < Rule -S2 must not be included. 

Sec. j. In the second column shall be set down the runs, 
> t any. made 1>\ < ach player, 

.Sec. 3. In the third column shall be placed the first base 
hits, if any, made by each player. 

The Scoring of Base Hits. 

Sec. 4. A base hit shall be scored in the following eases : 

When the hall from the bat strikes the ground on or 
within the foul lines and oul of the reach of the fielders. 

When a fair-hit ball is partially or wholly stopped by 
a fielder in motion, but such player can not recover himself 
in time to lu-ld the ball to first before the striker reaches 
that hasc or to force OUt another base runner. 

When the hall he hit with such force to an infielder or 
pitcher that he can not handle it In time to put out the 
batsman or force out a base runner. In a case of doubt 
over this class of hits, a base hit should be scored and 
the fielder exempted from the charge of an error. 

When the hall is hit so slowly toward a fielder that he 
cannot handle it in tune to put out the hat -man or force 
"tit a base runner. 

In all cases where a base runner is retired by being nil 
by a batted hall, unless batted h' Idmself, the batsman 
should be credited with a base hit. 

When a batted ball hit- the person or clothing ol the 
umpire, as defined in Rule 53, Section 6. 

In no case -hall a base hit he scored when a base runner 
is forced out by the play. 



Sacrifice Hits. 
Sec. 5. In the fourth column shall be placed the sacri- 
fice hits. 

crifice i llt shall be credited to the batsman who 
when no one 1-' out or when but one man 1- out, advances 
a runner a base by a hunt hit, which results in the batsman 
being put out before reaching first, or would so result it 
it were handled without en 



50 

Fielding Records. 

Set. 6. The number of opponents, if any. put out by 
each player shall be set down in the fifth column. Where 
the batsman is given out by the umpire for a foul strike. 
»»r fails to ba1 in proper order, the put -out shall be scored 
to the catcher, In rases of the base runner being declared 
"Miit" for interference, running out of line, or on an in- 
field fly, the "out" should be credited to the player who 
would have made the play but tor the action of the base 
runner or the announcement of the umpire. 

Sec. y. The number of times, if any, each player assists 
in putting out an opponent shall be se1 down in the sixth 
column. An assist should be given to each player who 
handles the ball in aiding in a run out or any other play 
of the kind, except the one who completes it. 

An assist should be given to a player who makes a play 
in time to put a runner out. even if the player who could 
complete the play fail, through no fault of the assisting 
player. 

And generally an assist should he given to each player 
who handles or assists in any manner in handling the 
hall from the time -it leaves the hat until it reaches the 
player who makes the put-out, or in case of a thrown 
hall, to each player who throws or handles it cleanly, and 
in such a way that a put -out results, or would result if 
no error were made by a team-mate. 

Assists should be credited to every player who handles 
the hall in the play which results in a base runner being 
called "out" for interference or for running out of line. 



Errors. 

8. An error shall be given in the seventh column 
for each misplay which prolongs the time at hat of the 
batsman or allows a base runner to make one or more 
bases when perfect play would have insured his being put 

cut. !»ut a wild pitch, a base on balls, a base awarded to 

a batsman by being struck by a pitched hall, an illegal 

pitch, a balk and a passed hall, each of which is a battery 
and not a fielding error, -hall not Ik- Included in the seventh 
column. 

An error -hall not be charged against the catcher i^v a 
wild throw in an ait- nipt to prevent a stolen base, unlese 
the base runner advan* ■ i base because <<t the error. 

An error shall not be scored against th< catchet 



■MPHPBB 



51 

infielder who attempts to complete a double play, unless 

the throw be so wild thai an additional b;i-<- be gained 

In case a base runner advance a base through the failure 
oJ a baseman to stop or try to stop a ball accurately thrown 
to his base, lit- shall be charged with an error and not the 
player who made such throw, provided there were occasion 
'"i" it. If such throw be made to second base the scorn 
shall determine whether the second baseman or shortstop 
shall be charged with an error. 

Stolen Bases. 

Sec. 9. A stolen base shall be credited to the base run- 
ner whenever he advances a ba>e unaided by a base hit, a 
put-out, a fielding or a battery error. 

The Summary. 
The Summary shall contain: 

RULE 86. pioN 1. The score made in each in- 

ning of the game and the total runs of each 
side in the game. 

_'. 1 he number of stolen bases, if any. made by 
each player. 

Sec. 3. The number of two-base hits, it any, made by 
each player. 

Sec. 4. The number of three-base hits, if any, made by 
each player. 

SEC. 5. The number of hemic run^, it" any, made by each 
play 

Sec, 6. The number of double and triple plays, if any, 
made by each side and the names of the players assisting 
in the same. 

Sec. 7. The number of innings each pitcher pitched in. 

Sec. 8. The number of base nits, if any, made off each 
pitcher. 

SEC. 0. The number of times, if any, the pitcher strike. 
out the opposing batsmen. 

Sec. 10. The number of times, if any, the pitcher gives 
on balls. 

Sec. 11. The number of wild pitches, if any, charged to 
tlie pitcher. 

Sec, u The number of times, if any, the pitcher hits a 
batsman with a pitched ball. 

Sec. 13. The number of passed balls by each catcher. 

Sec. 14. The time of the game. 
15. The name of the umpire. 



52 



INDEX TO RULES 



TO LAY OFF THK 1 J I'LL 

The gruund 

iJiaiuuud or Infield 

Catcher's lines 

Foul linen 

Players' Unea 

Coachers' linea 

Three-foot line 

Batsman's Unea 

Pitcher'a plat 

si.jp*> of Infield from pitcher's olate 

The baaea 

Mat. Tin) ..I 

The home baae ahape and size of 

listeria! <>f 

Marking the Unea material of 

The ball . . 

Weight and alze 

Make t» be used 

Number to be delivered (■■ unipi-»-. ......... . 

To be replaced if rendered unut foi play 

Return of those batted or thrown out of ground.. 
Alternate when to 01 placed In plaj 
Penalty for Intentional discoloring (amended 1907 
Furnished by home club (amended 1907J 
Tbe bat — material and si/.-- of 



Bee. Rule. 
l 
2 
3 

4 


7 
S 






im: PLAYERS AND THLJK POSITIONS. 

Number •>( players in the game. 

Plaj em' position* 

i lion .... 
Musi not mingle with apectab 
Uniforms and ah< • 
■ 

Umpin-s not to wait for notice from captains 



16 

17 

16 
19 

20 

L'l 
21 



Till REGULATION GAME. 

Time "f commencing championship gamea 
Number <»f inning .... 

Termination >>f ganx 

Termination of g completion "f fifth inning., 
innings game 

game fai 

lame (amended 1907 1 
Failure of b clul 

■ 1 of n elub t.. continue plaj 
Failure «<f ;i club i.. resume pi 

ting to dilatory ta< tl< a 
Wilfully violating 
Olaobej int.' order to remove 





28 




lit 




2ft 




26 




26 


- 




4 


26 



53 



N 



Less than nine players 

Second fame to i«-«in ten minutes after completion uf 

lirst 

If field be no! cleared in fifteen minutes 

When groundkeeper is under umpire's control. 

i mjtln- to mala- written report of forfeiture 

" game 

Substitutes ,. ,....»........."...., 

May take place of player at any time 

Base runner consent <>f opposing captain necessary... 

LUoice .if tunings fitness ..r field for play 

i Itching n.! 

l'-liv.-i\ «,r the ball to bat 

A fairly delivered ball (amended 19OT) 

An unfairly delivered ball (amended 19071.. 

I enalty fur delay by throwing to bases 

Penalty for delay in delivery to batsman 

Balking; 

Failure to deliver hall after making motion 

Failure to step toward has.' before throwing 

Delivery of hall while foot Is hark of phite 

Delivery of ball while not facing batsman 

Motion to deliver hall while not in position 

gelaj bag fame by holding hail 

Motion to pitch without having bull 

Any habitual motion without delivery of ball to bat.. 

Delivery of ball while catcher is outside of his lines., 
uead ball-— bitting batsman in position or umpire on foul 

n M ground 

gfU not in play 

Block balls: 

Touched or stopped by person not in game 

Empire to declare block 

Base runners tu stop under certain condition* 



Sec. 



Rule. 
26 

2tJ 

77 

29 

20 

•-•. 

gg 

2« 
28 
29 

30 
31 

32 
33 
33 

34 
34 
34 
84 

34 
34 
34 
34 
34 

35 

30 

37 

37 
37 



THE BATTING RULES. 

Batsman's position ... 

t batting 

£ir»1 batsman In each Inning 

1 layers of side at bab belong on bench 

Not to invade space reserved for umpire, catcher or 

batsman 

To vacate bem-h to prevent interference with fielder... 

* fair hit 

* foal hit 

» foul ii;» . 

A bunt hit 

Infield fly definition of 

Balls batted outside ground: 

Ml over fence or Into stand 

Pair or foul where last seen by umpire 

Batsman entitled to home run 

Strikes: 

Ball struck at bv batsman 

Fair ball not struek at 

Pool hit imt caught on fty unless batsman has two 

strikes 

Attempt to bast resulting in foal 

Misted strike but which loaches batsman 

F"»n tip held by catcher 

« foul strike 





38 




39 




40 




41 




42 




43 




41 




45 




4fl 




47 


8 


M 


1 


48 


1 


48 


2 


48 


1 


ffl 


I 


49 


3 


49 


4 


49 


6 




6 


41* 




50 



54 



THE BATSMAN IS OUT. 

If he fall to take position in proper turn 

If he fail to take position within one minute 

If he make, foul hit other than foul tip und bull is caught. 

If he make foul strike. 

if he Interfere with catcher 

if. with hist base occupied, three strikes are called 

if, while Attempting third Btrike, ball touch his person.... 

ir, befon two are out, be bits infield By. 

if third atrlke is called to accordance with Bee » or ."» *f 
Kill.- 19 

if be itep from one box to other (amended umjt* 

Till: BASE-BONKING Kld.F.s 

Legal order nf bases 

• before runner preceding 

Batsman becomes base runner; 

After be makes fair hit 

After four halls are called 

After three strikes are called 

If be he hit by pitched ball 

If catcher Interfere with him 

if fair hit strilce umpire >r base ronner 

Entitled to bases (without liability to be put out): 

if umpire call four balls 

if empire award batsman Brsl base fin- being hit by 
pitched ball 

If umpire award batsman fast base Ear Interference <<f 
c;i t cher . . 

if umpire award next batsman Ural base 

if umpire call a -Talk" 

ff pitched oali pass catcher tnd nit umpire 

if prevented from adrsneing by Haider's obstruction.. 

If fl-tder atop or euteh hall lllegu Uy 

Returning I Ithoul liability to la* pal out) : 

If umpire declare any foul nut legally caught. 

if umpire declare foal strike 

if umpire declare dead hall . . 

if am pi re interfere with catcher or throw 

if pitched hall struck al touches batsman 

When im! required to touch Intervening bases 

miners an* OU< " 

attempt to hinder catcher after three strikes 

Fielder bold fnlr hit 

Third st rike held by uelder 

Touched with ball after three strikes 

Fielder touches Aral base ahead of runner 

Banning oul of three-foot lines 

Runninj: out of line lifter baring reached first . 

Failure to i?old flelder in act of Balding ball 

Touched in Balder baring ball In possession 

MjiH held mi base before runner can return 

ed to racate base by iucc ling runner 

Nit by fair hall before touching Beider 

failure to touch bases in regular or reverse order 

Failure to return to base beld alien "time" was called 

if batsman interfere with play si home idnte 

lag preceding base runner 

running hrst bai ■ . 

ber drawing throw ?o plate 

• :■ 
Runner rouchlnK home before preceding runner 
Lmplre to declare out without appeal for declsl in 
< oachhif rules 
Si-orinic of runs 
Definition of a "f 





Ruhr 


1 


51 


s 


j l 


8 


51 


4 


r.i 


5 


5i 





ul 


7 


51 


H 


51 


9 


51 


1U 


51 




52 




52 


1 


63 


2 


63 


3 


53 


4 


53 


-, 


;..'. 


6 


53 



1 


.-. 1 


o 


54 


3 


64 


4 


54 


5 


54 


a* 


54 


1 


55 


■j 


i>.i 


3 




4 




5 







:,;> 


1 


66 


*> 




:t 




4 




5 




♦J 


5d 


7 


56 


M 


5rt 


9 


5o 


H> 


5o 


11 


re; 


12 


5d 


13 




1 1 


66 


15 


53 


10 


5C 


17 


5H 


18 


5« 


19 


5d 




Sri 












59 




69, 



jjBHBi 



55 



THE UMriRE AND His DUTIES 
' "Wor to fiifnrco decisions. 

( N " appeal frrun decision . . ! \ 

r ;'ntnin alone } Kl s right to appeal on rule construction 

,.; m "J question umpire's accuracy of judgment 

nnot change umpire during progress <>f gnu.. 



, . '""in.'* for violations .. 
napire to report lining or removal of player within 12 

., hours 

r!!! i( * lf> *V lon " f Bqpi and time of ' payment ','.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'..'.'.'..'.'. 
^mpire a report on flagrant < ases. 



Warning to 'captains .. 
'I'". 1 ") rules and materials of the gam 
""■ml announcements 

suspension of play .... 

'" «>f "timi 



^ciaicna en balls mil strikes 

1 osi t ion of umpire on field 



fli 
81 

62 
83 

64 

65 

66 

67 
68 
60 
70 
71 
72 
73 
74 



FIELD RULES 

'''■i*<> Vl s allowed on field other than players and a 

Spectators shall not be addressed 

' °»ies protection 



rnj.lre. 



75 
76 
77 



•'I'M,' 

"Ti 



GENERAL DEFINITIONS 



. . , 

Game" 

An Inning" ".' 

A time at hat" ... 
Wgal" or "legally* 1 



78 

7ft 

fin 
si 

82 
83 



THE SCORING RULES (Role R4». 

Hie batsman's record: 

Times s t ha t l 

Number of runs 2 

'•'Irst base hits 3 

When base bits should be 4 

Sacrifice bits ... 5 

ibe fielding record: 

Number of put outs, and explanation of 6 

NumiKT of assist*, and explanation of ■• 7 

Errors, snd explanation of 8 

Exemption fn.m errors 8 

Scorer to determine ■■• 8 

Jtplen bases 9 

foe summary . 

The score of each Inning and total runs l 

Th»" number of stolen bases 2 

The number of two-base hits. 3 

The number of three-base hit* 4 

The number of borne runs • f> 

The Dumber of double and triple plays 6 

The number of innings each pitcher pitched In 7 

The number of base hits made off each pitcher B 

The number of strike outs 9 

number of bsses on balls i*> 



The 
The 

The 
The 



number of wild pltche 
number of bit batsmen 
number of passed balls 
time of the gan ■ 
name of the ampin- . . 



ii 

12 

i:t 

14 

13 



85 

85 
8ft 

85 

B6 

85 

85 
85 
85 
85 
80 

86 
86 

H6 

m 

S6 
86 
86 
S6 
86 

ee 

86 
86 
88 

Ml 



56 



To Umpires, Managers and 
Players 

The attention of all National League Officials and 
Players is called to the following Resolution, adopted 
at the Annual Meeting of the League, at New York City, 
December 12, 1906: 

Resolved, That the President of this organization is 
hereby vested with full and absolute power to maintain 
order and discipline on the ball field, and that he shall 
have full power to discipline any player or manager for the 
violation of good order on the ball field ; that this discipline 
shall be either in a fine or suspension from the grounds of 
any club. That he shall be authorized to adopt such 
regulations for maintaining order on the ball field as he 
shall deem fit and proper; that he shall have full and 
absolute power to act upon any complaint made by the 
umpire against any player or manager for violation of order ; 
that in all cases where the penalty fixed is either a fine or 
suspension his decision shall be final. That in cases where 
he deems it fit and proper that the offender or offenders 
should be expelled from the organization, that such expul- 
sion shall not g:> into effect until same has been ratified by 
the Board of Directors (the President not voting). That 
this resolution and the powers granted herein shall prevail 
until repealed and that any provision either in the Con- 
stitution or Playing Rules of this organization in conflict 
with die provisions of this resolution shall be null and void 
during the life of this resolution. 



57 



Reconvened Annual Meeting of the 

National League of Professional 

Base Ball Clubs 

Held at the Victoria Hotel, New York City, 
Tuesday, June 19th, 1906. 

Meeting called to order at 12 o'clock noon. 

President II. C. Pulliam in chair; John Heydler acting 
as Secretary. 

Present : 

Brooklyn— -Chas, h. Ebbets. 

Philadelphia— William Shettsline. 

Pittsburg— Will Locke, 

St Louis — Frank de Hass Robison and M. S. Robison. 

I he Boston and Chicago clubs were represented by 
proxies held by President Pulliam. 

The Cincinnati Club was r< by proxy held by 

Will Locke. 

ling of minutes of last meeting was laid over. 

The Chair made report of financial condition of League. 

The Chair stated that, as result of mail vote. $i,ooo had 
been donated by the League for the relief of San Fran- 
cisco sufferers. 

On recommendation of joint committee of all organized 
leagues, tlie League voted the sum of $*,co to aid the 
Pacific Coast Base Ball League, and further agreed to con- 
tribute $150 by each of its clubs for the same purp 

Mr. Ebbets presented a resolution pro\ r the 

furnishing by all League clubs of proper d: ,nms 

!,, r visiting players. The same was unanimously indoi 
and referred to Committee on Constitution, with instruc- 



58 



tion to present an amendment to the Constitution at the 
December meeting covering the provisions of t he resolu- 
tion. 

On motion of Mr. Ebbets, and with the purpose of stop- 
ping indiscriminate hatting practice prior to beginning of 
a game and confining the same to the diamond proper, the 
League voted to make the following changes in the cus- 
tomary time allotments for batting practice: 

"Beginning one hour before time advertised for begin- 
ning of game, the time to be divided by the contestant 
clubs as follows : 

"First 20 minutes to home club for batting practice. 

"Second 20 minutes to visiting club for batting practice. 

"Next 10 minutes to home club for fielding practice. 

"Final 10 minutes to visiting club tor fielding practice." 

At 1 130 o'clock P. M., the League adjourned, subject to 
call of Chair. 



BMBB(HpM(PM(PfrMBB[ 



59 



Annual Meeting of the National 

League of Professional 

Base Ball Clubs 

Held at the Victoria Hotel, New York City. 
December 11 to 13, inclusive, 1906, 

Tuesday, December u, 1906. 

Meeting called to order at 2:30 P. M. 

President Harry C. IVi.i.iam in the Chair* 

John A. Heydler acting as Secretary. 

Present : 

•V H. SoDEN and George B. Dovey. representing the 
Boston League Ball Club. 

Charles H. Ebbets and Henry Medhts. representing 
the Brooklyn Ball Club. 

CHARLES W. MURPHY, representing the Chicago 1 
Ball Club. 

John T. Brush and Fred M. Knowles, representing the 
National Exhibition Company of New Vork. 

W. J. Shettsune and D. LeRo\ Reeves, representing 
the Philadelphia Ball Company. 

Barnes Dreyfi - and Win. Locke, representing the 
Pittsburg Athletic Company. 

On roll call, Mr. Soden announced his retirement from 
tli'' councils of the National League and introduced Mr. 
George l'». Dovey, his successor as President of the Boston 
Club. 

As a mark of esteem, the League, by rising vote, elected 

Messrs. Arthur H. Soden and W. H. Conant honorary 

members of the National League for life. A Committee 

i-ting of Messrs. Herrmann, Ebbets and Dreyfuss 



60 

was appointed to present, at a later meeting, a resolution 
on the retirement of Messrs. Soden and Conant. 
A recess was taken until 8 P. M. 



Tuesday, December n, 1906. 

Meeting reconvened at 8 130 P. M. 

All clubs present save New York and Cincinnati. 

The minutes of the reconvened Annual Meeting of Feb- 
ruary 14 and 15, 1906, were read and approved. 

The minutes of the summer meeting of June 19 were 
read and approved. 

The President presented his annual report, which was 
spread upon the minutes. 

On motion, it was d< tender a complimentary 

banquet to Messrs. Soden and Conaut. and a committee 
consisting of Messrs. Dreyfuss. Murphy and Herrmann 
was appointed to take charge of same. 

A recess was taken until December 12. 



Wednesday, December 12, 1906. 
ing called to order at 1 :jo P. M.. all clubs 
ent 
The report of the Board oi Directors was approved and 
ordered spread on the minutes. The report carried with 
it the award of the championship of 1906 to the Che 
ue Ball Dub. 
:r amendments to Constitution, Mr. Brush offered 

the following, which \\ 

SEC. 49. 3. Each park shall also !>«■ pro 
1 with proper and suitable dressing room 
or rooms for visiting players, the same to be 

supplied with toilet convenient id cold 



61 

water and shower bath, and twenty suitable 
lockers for such players. Such dressing rooms 
to be properly heated and cared for and made 
subject to tlie control during occupancy there- 
of of the players of tie j club. The 
penalt) for failure to provide and maintain 
such dressing roorn^ shall be $25 for each day 
of failure to provide the same according to 
this rule; the same to be I and col- 
lected by the Secretary of the League upon 
the complaint of the visiting club. 

On motion, Messt . Dreyfuss and Brush were 

appointed a committee on uniform tickets of admission. 

Election of officers being in order, the President vacated 
the chair in favor of Mr. Herrmann. 

Mr. Harry C. Pulliam was placed in nomination tor the 
office of President for the ensuing year and, at the termina- 
tion of the ballot, was declared elected 

Mr. John A. 1 leydler was placed in nomination for the 
position of Secretary-Treasurer of tin- League for the 
ensuing year and, at the conclusion of the ballot, was de- 

d elected. 

rs. Dreyfuss, EbbetS, Herrmann, Murphy and 
Dovey, as representatives "i their 1 clubs, were 

nominated and declared elected as Directors of the Na- 
tional L the ensuing year. 

I be following Committees were appointed to 
during the ensuing year : 

ututiou Messrs. Brush, Herrmann, and Ebl 

Playing Rules — Messrs. Dreyfuss, rlanlon, ami Murphy. 

1 he League, on motion of Mr. Murphy, unanimously 
readopted the resolution giving the President power to 
1"* ei ve discipline on the ball held. 

After the transaction ol routine bta was 

taken until 1 o'clock on Friday, December 13. 




nvened at r:io P. M.. all clubs 

• ni. 

o and 39 of the Const I 

tion of ilx i parating 

i President from that urcr. 

An informal dis( a d upon the mat* 

admission of the Tri-State League into the • 
the National Agreement, 

On motion, the League adjourned, to meet at the call 
of the Chair. 







BWW1 VI 



Reconvened Annual Meeting of the 

National League of Professional 

Base Ball Clubs 

Held at the Victoria Hotel, New York City, 
Monday and Tuesday, February 25 and 26, 1907. 

FIRST DAY 

Monday, February 25, 1907. 
Meeting called to order in Parlor 228 at 3 :$o P. M. 

Harry ('. Imlliam in chair; John Heydler, Secretary. 

Present: 

Geo. li. Dovey and John S. C. Dovey, representing the 
11 National League Base Ball Company. 

Chas. II. Ebbets and II. \V. Medicus, representing the 
Brooklyn Ball Club. 

Charles W. Murphy, representing the Chicago League 
Ball Club. 

An. 1st Herrmann, representing the Cincinnati Exhi- 
bition Company. 

John T. Brush, representing the National Exhibition 
Company of New York. 

Wm, J. SiiETi slink and D. LeRoy Reeves, representing 
the Philadelphia Ball Company. 

Will LOCKE, representing the Pittsburg Athletic Com 
pany. 

M. S. RoBISQN and Frank deHass RoBISON, representing 
the American Base Ball and Athletic Exhibition Company 
of St. Lo« 

The minutes of the December, 1906, meeting were read 
and appr< 

The report of the Board of D approving the 

transfer of the National League franchise from tin- Boston 
Ball Association to the new Boston National Lea 
- Ball Company was unanimously concurred in. 



64 

The committe< tig of Messrs, Herrmann, Drey- 

and Ebbets, appointed to draft suitable resolutions on 
the retirement of Messrs. Soden and Conant, presented 
its report. On motion of Mr. Povey, the same was unani- 
mously adopted, and copies of the resolution ordered to be 
rossed and sent the retiring o ton Club. 

Mr. Ebbets presented the report of committee on uni- 
form tickets and turnstiles. The League unanimously 
voted l'i adopt the uniform ticket and rain check plan 
outlined. The contract for the printing of the seven or 
more million tickets required was ordered to be placed 
with a union label firm. 

lent Puiliam announced his umpire staff for 1907 
as follows: Robert Emslie, Henry OT)a>\ J. E. Johnstone, 
Win. J. K!em. W. B. Carpenter, and Chas. Rigler. 

A n taken until 2 o'clock 1 1 






SECOND DAY. 

Tuesday, February 26, 1007 
Meeting called to order at 3 o'clock P. M II C Pulliam 
in chair. John ITeydler, Secretary. 
All clubs represented. 

The report of the Joint Playing Ru mittee was 

1 by Mr. Locke, secretary of the committee The 
same was received and filed. (See amended Raying 
Rul< 

Secti< istitution lended 

form with L H«n in separating the 

m tliat of Secretai irer. 

*** e m ^" mform tickets and improvement of 

turnsti 

1 he Playing Schedule for - : [ 1907 wra 

" nt,,t 1) -' unanimously adopted. 

Al 5-45 ' m. the l abject to 

call of the f hair. 



0HHP 



65 



Officers and Members 

1 l.c following is an official list of the Officers of the National League 
I f 1 rofessional Bafe Ball Clubs, and Off.cers of C'uhs members tl>- 
for t!:e season of 1907 . 

President, 

HARRY C PULLIAM, 

Rooms 1424-1426 St. James Building, New York City 

Telephone, 2209 Madison (Long Distance) 

Secretary-Treasurer, 

JOHN A. HEYDLER. 

(Address as above.) 



Board of Directors 
BARNEY DREYFUSS. CHARLES H. EBBETS. 

CHARLES W. MURPHY, GEO B. DOVEY, 
AUGUST HERRMANN. 






BOSTON NATIONAL LEAGUE BASE BALL 
COMPANY. 

1118 Paddock Building. 

GEO. B. DOVEY, President and Treasurer. 
JOHN S C DOVEV. Secrrt„v 



THE BROOKLYN BALL CLUB, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

CHARI.l.S 11 EBBETS, President-Manager 
HENRY W MEDIC US, I 

C II EBBETS, JR.. 



66 
CINCINNATI EXHIBITION COMPANY, 

( mcinnati, Ohio. 
AUGUST HERRMANN, President. 
MAX C. FLEISCHMANN. Secretary and Treasurer, Wiggins Block. 

CHICAGO LEAGUE BALL CLUB, 

Chicago, III. 
CHARLES W. MURPHY, President, 1115 Masonic Temple. 
CHARLES G. WILLIAMS, Secretary and Treasurer 

CHARLES H THOMAS. Associate Secretary. 

PITTSBURG ATHLETIC COMPANY, 
Pittsburg, Pa. 

BARNEY DREYFUSS, President W H. LOCKE, Secretary. 
I anna Bank Building. 

PHILADELPHIA BALL COMPANY, 
Philadelphia. Pa. 
WM. J. SHETTSL1NE, Pmdeat 

D LeROY REEVES. Secretary. 

EDWIN I. HYNEMAN, Treasure'- 
819-21 Real Estate and Trust Building. 

NATIONAL EXHIBITION COMPANY. 

New York. 
JOHN T. BRUSH, President. 
FRED M KNOWLES 

RoOl 

AMERICAN BASE BALL AND ATHLETIC 
EXHIBITION COMPANY OF ST. LOUIS. MO- 

M. S. ROB1SON ; and Treasurer 

FRANK DeHASi lent. 



wm*m 



WM 



67 



Club Lists of Players 

Who Participated in the National League 
Championship Campaign of 1906 

ECAGO. 

Manager, Frank I 

Pitchers— Orval Overall. Mordecai Brown, Johl 
ter, Ed Reulbach, rt Wicker, Chas. llar- 

I M-r - J<»hn \\\ Taylor, and Car] I-un-i. -clnTs— 

John Kling, P, J. Moran. Infield mk Chance, John 

Evers, Harry Steinfeldt, Joseph Tinker. Outfiddei 
Jan* Sheckard, Frank Schuto , Utility— 

Arthur Hofman, li. 1! , L, ( K Smith, I\ N001 

Thomas Walsh. 

NEW YORK. 
Manager. John McGraw, 
Pit ,. Wiltse, 1 -in lie r Tayl 

McGinnity, and Chris. Math- itch- 

rald, W'ni. R Marshall, tnith, 

'"o'ink Bowennan, k Lnnelders D 

McGann, Wm. Gilbert, Arthur Devlin, Win. Dahlea <>ut 

Mike Donlin, J. B. 
o Browne, Utility Sam Strang, John Mc 
Gr aw, Frank Burke, John Hannifin 

PITTSBURG 
Fred Garke, Man 
, Pitchers Homer Hillebrartd, J A M 
f,, ' lf] - Ed Karger, CI l Farland . M. 

McIJve, Howard Camnita Wil- 






i 



68 

lis. Catchers— Geo. Gibson, Henry IV it/.. F. C. Carisch, 
Harry Smith, Edw. Phe!f>& Infielders— James Nealon, 
Claude Ritchey, Thosi Leach, John Wagner, Thns. Shee- 
han, Allan Storke, Wm. Abstein. Outfielders- -Fred 

Clarke. Clarence Beaumont, R. S. Ganley, Otis Clymer, 
Arthur Meier, Wm. Mailman. 



PHILADELPHIA. 
Hugh Duffy, Manager. 
Pitchers— Chas. Pittenger, H. Kane, Chas, A. Nicto 
Walter E. Moser, T. E. Sparks. Chas. Roy, J. J. MrCl-s- 
key, Wm. Duggleby. Louis Richie, John Lush. Catchers— 
Chas. Dooin, J. E. Donovan. C. Cri<t. 11. Huston. In- 
fielders— Wm. Bransneld, Wm. Gleason, I.. E. Courtney, 
M. J. Doolin, Paul Sentell, Jos. A. Ward Outfielders— 
S. Magee, Roy Thomas. John 'finis. Utility— Hugh Duffy. 

BROOKLYN. 

P. J. Donovan. Man.v/ 
Pitchers— Jai Gorious, J. II. Doescher, J. W. Wait- 

ing, M. W Eason, W. I). Scanku "has. 

E. MeEarland. Elmer Siricklett. H. M. Mclniyrc Catch- 
. Louts Ritter, John Butler. Infielders— 
T. J. Jordan, H. II. Gessler, Chas, V Mpermau, Jaj 
Casey, Philip Lewis, J. II. Hummel. Outfielders-^ A. 
McCarthy. Win A Malon-y. II C. Lumley, Emil Batch, 
P. J. Donovan! Philip Reardoa 

CINCINNATI 
ard i [anion, Mana 
Pitchers I Mall. : flfont 

Carl Dnth- • r> \y m !n -r. 

Bob 

r 

P. Livingston. Edw. Phelj lei, John M..I 



69 

Infielders— J. C Harry, C. C. Can*, John W. Deal, Miller 

W. Iluggins, James Delahanty, John Lobert, Thos. Cor- 

11. If. Mowrcy. Ed. Tiemeyer. Outfielders — Jos. J. 

Kelley, J B Seymour, Fred Odweil, Frank Jade, Wm 

Hinchraan, James Barrett, Johja IL Siegle, Homer Smoot. 



ST. LOUIS. 
John McCloskey, Manager. 
Pitchers— I. C. Higginbotham, C. Adams, Chas. Rhodes, 
John Thielman, Gram McGrynri, Brown, Chas. 

E. McFarland, Ed ECarger, J. (\. Thompson, Carl Druhot, 
A. Pttttmann, A. Fromme, A. J. Egan, F. L. Beebe, John 
\V. 'Iayl.»r. Catchers— Mike Grady, J. F. Slattety, J X. 

rthy, Thos. J. Raub, IL Holmes, Wm. K. Marshall. 
Infielders— Jos. J. Beckley, Justin Bennett, Harry Arn<!t. 

F. A. Crawford, Geo. F, McBride, Edw, Holly, i ; .. I). 
Zimmerman, Wm. Phyle, P Noonan. Outfielders— W. P. 
Shannon, Homer Smoot, John Htmes, Thos. O'Hara, S. B. 

iui C Barry, Arthur DeGroff, J. H. Marshall, 
A. W. Bttrch, John J. Murra) Utility— Arthur Hoeis- 
«r. 

iSTON. 
Fred Teaney, Manag 
Pitchers— Irving M. Young, Frank Pfeffer, Leroy With- 
erup, V. A. Lindaman, August I W T. 

rthy. Catchers Thos. NTeedham, John 
Sam Brown, [nfielders Fred Tenney, Albert 
David Brain, A. II. Bridwell, J Connaughtoi 
d, i [any Dolan, John B it 
I Inward Utility Cameron, Diehl, Speni 
len. 

UMPIRl 

R<.!.. I E. Johnst. nir, 

Klcm, Wm li Carpenter, J. II. I Wm. 

R 



St r. ' 
I eld 

Sri i 



Wm J. 
Supple, 



70 






The New Drafting Section of the 
National Agreement 

(Amended, 1906.) 



ARTICLE VI 
SEC. 6. The right of a Minor League club to its play- 
ers shall be absolute, except that from September is< to 
October 15th oi each year Major League clubs shall 1> 
the privil iecting pi tional Asso- 

ciation clubs for the following season, 
$r,ooo for each pla d from clubs in Class "A" 

Leagues; $750 for each ]>'. clubs in 

Class *T." Leagues; $500 n. r each player ted rVoro 

clubs in Class "'*"" Lei d $300 for each player so 

cted tram dubs of a lower ■■ payments to be 

made IN IT'LL to the Secretary «.f the Nan 
tion, through tin- Secretary of tin- Commission, al the lime 
when the selection is made, the p revert to the 

club from which he v. ted, if, when released, 1 

d within ten a club of a Major 

provided, however, that not more than one player shall 
be from any Class "A" club during any 1 



71 



National League Averages . 



CLUB HATTING. 



Club. 
Chicago 

I'n i>l>iirj<: 

Philadelphia . 
('inclnna i i 
Brooklj 
si. Lou 
Boaton 



Name and Clob. 
r, Pittatrari 

Lamley, Brooklyn 
\i..\v rey, Cincinna 
< hance, • Chicago 

Strang, N*u V.-rk 

DonllB, New ?orl 

[nnati . . 
Clarke, Pittsburg 
thy, Brooklyn 

Ward* Philadelph 
Iluggina, t . 
Seymi 

iburg 

Tennej 

Philadelphia 

Bchtilte, Chi 

Delehfi mat! 

leld, Philadelphia 
n ; ■ 
Arinli 

Mailman, Pittabnn 
Ritchie, Plttaburg 
Barrj 

P, Cllirlllti:. ' 

THiih. IMifhul-lflihi 
Burcb, St. Louli 

Brown* 

Leah, Philadelph I 

I 
Jordan 



a. ai 


. K. 


BH, TB, SB. 


IB 


IK 


PC. 




:H 7W 


1090 igj 


71 








i;.i SO 


WIS 1047 104 


87 




. 80 1 






1217 l 


ISO 102 




18 






154 1911 :,:u 




.in 1ST 


17 


13 


.z\\ 






1198 1528 liu 


71 


it; 




104 17" 




UM i 














69 


10 




i:w no 






1118 ! 




10 




119 9:i 


DIYID! 


fAL 


BATTING. 






















H. 




s. S. 




\\\ 


B 


BH 




8B 


It. 


PC. 


11. B. 


140 




loo 











.:<39 




S3 


18 


■> 














1) 1 


LSI 




81 






10 






• 


... i::i 




n 


17 
183 
L00 


104 Ji 
L80 10 


12 

LO 

4 


1 

o 

I 






17 


I 






. 104 






123 


r> 


38 


48 5 
114 16 


1 

B 


1 

2 




B 9 










80 








M 




1 8 80 


Il'l 


417 






172 14 




I 














111 12 


1 







10 B 






n 


149 




X 












ti 






8 


1. 






140 




83 




1VI 11 


7 


II 






i.'.t 




70 




818 18 














83 


180 


it;:: 10 


7 
8 


1 
1 








17 17 






77 








1 










1 






1 


Q 




2 






77 








7 






124 






ill 


in 22 


1 




281 




ill 










t 


1 










If 


L44 






1 






10 




(0 


v: 




_> 





-71 


4 4 








88 


100 7 








4 r, 






12 






1 


1 


77H 


l :i 


1 .. i 




to 








1 














it:: 19 




1 




10 17 


u 











n 




















1 




10 11 


■«i 










1 



























123 




03 




in 10 


4 


















I 











n 


I 




30 4 


1 












Of 


150 




7 


1 










N 






10 


1 










87 






x 


1? 




10 10 


147 




10 








1 




10 17 




m 

















ii 


144 








7 
I 


i 





















4 






. 






72 



INDIVIDUAL BATTING 

Name and Club, \B. R. 

gojman, Chicago ...... 

Batch, Brooklyn . ;,- 303 

Nealon, Pittsburg 154 

rbomas, Philadelphia t42 

Gnaaler, Brooklyn-Chicago ... 81 in n 

Smoot, st. Louls-Clnclnnatt., 145 

Bates, Boston ,,„ >, 52 

Alperman, Brooklyn r>? m 3s 

»oran. Chicago n 226 22 

Drain, Boston ijw -.••-, <■> 

Grady, St. Louis \ f 2 

Dolan, Boston |g 

Beckley, St. Louis m 29 

nyll.s, Clncinnatl-Pittabnrg. 

Sehlei, Cincinnati 113 

gSte Philadelphia . . 07 

PWJjjPPe. Pittsburg 33 

Lewis. Brooklyn 

jwrtes, New Yort 134 144 r,7 

Bbeehan. Pittsburg 

McGann, New York 133 ,-, 33 

Conrtney, Philadelphia 

!,*^- l! :;". ,kl > n m* an 71 

1 nikfr. < hlcago -•.-? >k 

gilbert, New York 

Druhot, Cinclnnati-St. i 

Doolln, Philadelphia .. . 154 

gentell, Philadelphia 

Kelley. Cincinnati 

Bowerman, I 

gjjason Philadelphia 

Bridwell, Boston 

Hoelskoettor. St, . *,, ::iT .,, 

Odwell. Cinciniuiti 
Maloney, Bro. 

Pittsburj 
Leever, Pitt 
^.Cincinnati 
Kitter, Brooklyn 
Deal, Cincinnati 
Brown Bam 
Taylor, J., M . j 

.">■'- ;■:"•. Cincinnati n 7 90 29 

•rd. st. Lou la 

■Me 
gvsas 

HammeB. Brooklyn 

Needham. Boaton 
Scanlan. Brooklyn 
P*ylor, I.. New York 



—(Continued.) 

r.ii 1 B 



62 7 1 

196 m 

in m 

125 11 'i 

127 17.: 

Ill 149 

i::i 17:, 

70 96 

7'' 107 

89 107 

20 22 

11 M m 

113 1-IM 

lH 128 

107 127 

71 82 
] :■ 1 8 

122 159 

1 ! :. 1 



112 1 82 

I'M III 






2«J 

17 
IS 



11 
31 

1R 



II. 

ft PC. 



17 11 
21 :. 



3 
1 

8 
I 

1 

18 io 
6 3 



7 
19 n 

1 

1 
7 
1 
1 








1 


















! 




8 


. 2S2 


a 











.260 






*i 




9 


,247 


1 




4 












-11 







i 




1 


241 


1 


.249 





.240 





.239 







o 





l .231 

221 

1 114 

-ill 

1 .198 



S. S. 

H. B, 

6 13 

7 3 
21 49 
21 IS 

11 22 



7 

9 
9 

26 13 
8 6 

17 11 



17 19 



17 22 

36 30 



1 11 

R 17 

U 9 

7 2 

9 11 





* 
2 

10 
4 

4 

4 

4 
1 



73 



INDIVIDUAL BATTING, (Continued.) 



Name* and Clttb, Gh 

O'Neill, Boston 

< axnefon, Boston i* 

Overall, Cincinnati-Chicago... 81 

Landgren, Chicago . 

(iibson, Pittsburg 81 

J'h.vl.., St. Louis 21 

Thompson, si. L<»nis • W 

Mciutyre, Brooklyn 

Willis, Plttabnrg II 

Niiniiiii). Chicago-St, Lonli 

• . Cincinnati 81 

McBride, St. L<mis 

Brown, Chaa., St. L 

en, Brooklyn 109 

Living Innati 47 

Marshall, L. St. Lonis 
Reulbacb, Chicago 
Wicker, Chicago-Cincinnati... 30 
sharks. Philadelphia U 

-t. Louis. ... 34 

t)agglel>y, Philadelphia 42 

Pantorlous, Brooklyn 29 

Bwing, Clncinnal i 33 

Dorner, Cincinnal l-Boston 
Ltndaman, B 
WciMnnity, New fort 

Hall, Cincinnati 

Leifleld, Plttabnrg 

Siegle, Cincinnati .... 
Voting, Boston 
oklj n 



Pittenger, Philadelphia 
Bgan, 8t, Loati 
Ames, Ne« Jforl 
Ritchie, Philadelphia 
•■•r, Chicago 



AIL 
W7 

SI 

84 

7:s 

::i 
108 
US 

ll'S 

813 



139 

7t> 

mi 
119 

^7 

N 

71 
HI 

LOS 
LOS 
LIS 

17 

68 

H 
29 

M 



B. HII. TB. SB. SB. 



SO 

11 

I'- 
ll 
16 
L3 
6 

is 
20 
U 
It 

14 

16 
13 

11 
16 

18 

it 

to 

ii 
it 

M 
16 

»; 

n 

12 



«; 



Name and Club. 

Pittsburg 
New V*. ik 
Cincinnati 

st. Louii ... 
Philadelphia 

|yn 



(LIU FIELDING 
P 
4160 

4018 



11 
IS 
L6 

21 
17 
|Q 

31 

•jo 
18 

16 
22 
18 
17 
23 
It 
17 
It 
is 
18 
8 
11 
It 
13 
10 



A. 
2120 



1NDIVID1 \L PtELDING. 
FIRST Lasim 



L. 
171 



II 

ii. PC. 

180 

ii 180 

,179 

!7S 

ii .175 

6 17J 

1 .172 

.171 

1 165 
n .131 
.158 

o 



158 
167 
157 

151 

ill 
in 
189 
138 

130 

125 
lis 
096 

i I'M 

069 



P. s 
II. B, 

o 
ft 
l 
ft 
i 
I 


a 



o 

3 
fi 

7 
1 



1 
:: 
6 
4 

I 

12 


I 

1 
3 
1 
3 
1 
6 
l 
i 
3 

1 
4 
7 
I 

1 

1 

1 



x .-. 






P B 

14 

21 
38 
13 



Nanw ifid Club. 

Nealon, I'M: 
Deal, Cincinnati, 



a B PC 

I 



Name and Cfob. 
Ttr.ii. j . Boston, 
Carr, Cincinnal I 

.mi r i 
1 1 nit ii Mi- 1 1. Bn 
• i 

Jordan, Bmoklj n 






0, 


PO, 




PC 










89 








y 




17 4 








6 3 




























n 




11 7 





74 



&M*—*. 



Nanif and Club, 

Ritchie, Pittsburg, 
llumnn'11, Br'klyn, 
Bennett, St. Louis, 
Muggins, ('in.. 
Kvers, Chicago, 
Gleasou, Phila., 



INDIVIDUAL FIELDING.— (Continued.) 
SECOND BASEMEN, 



Cr, 


PO. A. E. 


PC, 


1 5 1 




.9fiR 








153 


296 447 41 


.948 


in; 


241 458 n 


'.Ms 


• 


344 411 41 


247 


] 32 


216 261 22 


517 



Name and Club. 
Strobel, Boston, 
Strang, N. v., 
Alperman, Br'klyn, 
Gilbert, N, ST. 
Howard. Boston. 
Seutell, Phila.. 



G. r<>. a. r:. pc. 
59 M». 173 17 944 

45 ks l^i ; 
19 35 38 • 



Arndt, St. Louis. 
Lobert, Cincinnati. 
StHnfddt Chicago. 
Sheehan, Pittsburg. 
Devlin, \. v.. 
Hoelskoetter, St. L 
Phyle, St. Louis, 
Mow re jr. Cin., 



THIRD BASEMEN. 



16 I os 129 9 .966 

17 69 5 959 

I 29 .954 

10 104 166 16 .947 

lis i7i 266 2] .944 

<W 114 11 .943 

31 41 B .926 

20 32 4 .930 



53 

21 
15 



Leach. Pittsburg, 
Ward, Phila.. 
Courtney. Phi In.. 
Casey, Brooklyn. 
Brain, Boston, 
Delahaiity. Cin., 
Sentell, Phila., 



96 

27 



73 135 lfi .929 

37 42 | |29 

91 U2 163 23 .923 

149 172 272 39 .919 
ir* 208 221 
106 126 170 

33 35 47 13 .837 



Tinker, Chicago, 
McBridp, St. Louis, 
Wagner, Pittsburg, 

►ran, Cin., 
Dahlen, N. v.. 
Hoelskoetter, St. L. 
Doolin, Phils., 



SHORTSTOPS. 

147 2SR 472 45 .944lBridwell, Boston, 
10 194 310 30 .144 Crawford. St. I,. 

241 Lewis, Brooklyn. 



117 26 ^ 

143 29? 1541 12 932 

34 J4 45 5 932 

154 395 4 so (4 .930 



Alporman, Br'klyn, 
Lobert, Cin., 
Meier, Pittsburg, 



119 322 390 

56 i<i- 

241 393 51 f»22 

fi2 78 12 .921 

49 SO 13 90S 

42 38 9 



131 



.891 




Gessler, Chicago. 
Marshall. N | . 

Sheckard, Chicago, 
Thomas, Phils., 
Magee. Phila.. 
Lush, Phils., 
Himes, st. Louis, 
Slagle, Chiet 
Hofman, Chicago, 
Sehulte, Chh 
Meier, Pittsburg, 

Titus. Phila.. 

Clarke. Pittsburg, 
Seymour, cin. \ v 
Leach, l*iit 
Shannon.*. L \ v 
Maloney, Br'klyn 
Kelley, Cincinnati 
Ganley. Pittsburg, 
7ude, Cincinnati. 
>klyn 
Odwell, CIn< 



OUTFIELDERS. 



21 


27 


4 


1666 


L« 


19 


| 


6 


L0O0 


M9 




12 


4 


.986 


142 


340 


12 


B 


\> -.»; 


154 




is 


1 


.982 




41 


8 


1 


.978 


411 




to 




.977 


127 


276 





7 




2! 




j 


1 




146 




18 


8 




61 


73 




- 


975 








7 


.974 


110 


309 


16 


6 




151 




17 


10 




M 


131 


I 


4 






274 




16 


9ftf 


151 






13 


166 


122 






7 


266 




2i>7 


16 


s 








n 


1 


9C5 




101 




1 


*;i 




94 


i*« 


4 





Bresnahan, N. Y., 
Hincbman, Cto., 
Murray. St. J^mis. 
EHegle, cin., 
Bates, B 

Hummell, Br*klvn, 
Smoot, St. L. -Cin.. 
Lumley, Br'kryu, 
Beaumont, Pitts., 

N.Y St.L. 

Strang, 

liallniau. I' 
tie, N. Y.. 
972 Burch, St. Louis, 

Br'klyn, 

t 1. , 

all. St. L..ij[» 
a, B<.aton. 



40 


71 


s 


3 


9fi3 


14 


23 


1 


1 




84 


43 


7 


z 






<r> 


1 


2 




140 




12 


11 




20 




2 


1 




146 




IS 


16 




131 


231 


13 




919 


78 


148 


6 


'} 


ft ij 


134 


m 


!t 


it 




98 






4 




40 


40 


I 


1 






153 


17 


12 




91 




16 


12 


.934 


I 


39 





1 




144 




20 


is 




N 


166 


13 


14 


921 


14 




10 


8 


.922 


s7 


119 


14 


u 


.911 






6 


s 




34 


60 


6 


8 


.872 


16 


20 


2 


4 


.993 



75 



INDIVIDUAL FIELDING- (Continued). 

us. 

Name and Club. G P,0, a* B, 

Bowennan. Haw Jork *7 106 

KHng, Chicago 96 foe ISt 12 

Morn n, Chicago M M6 7s * 

I'eitz, Pittsburg U IM tfi 

Kiif.-r. Brooklyn KJ 211 ^ ,; 

Bergen, Brooklyn ...- Ml «S U9 15 

E'beips, Cincinnatl-Pittsbnrg 52 881 4r. 7 

'Bresnaban, New V..rk s2 «7 125 H 

Grady, St. Louii 67 H5 67 5 

O'Neill, Boston « «* 2 !J 

Brown. Boston 62 ' 

Gibson, Pittsburg 81 338 73 13 

Marshall. Now Y-.rk-St. Lniils 49 240 69 10 

Schlei, Cincinnati 91 455 139 24 

Livingston, Cincinnati 47 202 62 

Needham, Boston 76 317 130 19 

Noonan, St. Lonis 23 11s ■« . J 

Ranb. st. Lonii g « » J 

Donoran. Philadelphia J - Jj 

Dootn, I'hiUoVliiUlE -' «* nl J - 



T.C. l\C. I'.B. 





.984 


8 






7 






6 


236 


.y:i» 


7 


278 




6 


hi 'j 




10 


181 


.975 


B 




.974 


M 


187 


.973 


10 


841 


,:ki 






.970 




422 


.969 


13 


319 


.969 




618 


.Ml 


11 




.960 




466 


.JC.3 




161 


.957 




116 






287 






111 


.94* 





76 



RECORD OF national LEAGUE PITCHING 

of thi.se who pitched fifteen or more kuui^s, arranged a<H 

fco percentage of \ Left 



irdintf 



Name and Club. 



Reulbaeh, Chicago 33 

Brown, Chicago ...36 

Leever, Pittsburg 36 

Lundgren, Chicago 27 

Pfeiater, Chicago :n 

McGinnity, New 5Tori 45 

*ivit;iJ1. Cincinnati (18) -Chicago... 81 

Tayb.r, New York 31 

Mathewson, New York 

Willis. Pittsburg ..41 

Taylor, St. Until (17) -Chicago 34 

Beebe, Chicago (14)-St Louis 34 

Philiippe, Pittsburg 33 

Wiltsie, N.u York .... 38 

Weimer, Cincinnati 41 

Scanlan, Brooklyn 38 

Leifield, Pittsburg 37 

Lush, Philadelphia 37 

Ames, New York 31 

Lynch, Pittsburg 18 

Sparks, Philadelphia . 42 

Swing, Cincinnati 33 

Druh.it. Cincinnati (4)-8t Louis iy 

Bichle, Philadelphia 33 

Plttenger, Philadelphia 89 

Stricklett, Brooklyn 41 

Pastorions, Brooklyn 29 

Ouggleby. Philadelphia 

Young, Boston . 43 

Me in tyre, Brooklyn ... . . 39 

Pfeffer, Ronton 

Bason, Brooklyn .... 34 

Wicker, Chicago (10) -Cincinnati M 

Linda man, Boston 

Brown. St. Louis 

Fraser, Cincinnati 21 

Kar^tT. Pittsbnrg mi i St. Louis 30 

Dorner, Cincinnati (2) -Boston M 

Bgan, St. Louis i« 

Thumpauu. St. Ix»uii .., 17 





< 


U 


E- 


E 


17 


74 


3 


94 


.968 


18 


81 


2 


101 


.980 


11 


52 


3 


86 


.955 


10 


G3 




64 


.984 


21 


62 






.922 


22 


105 


13 


140 


907 


8 


56 




69 


.928 


10 


54 




68 


.941 


15 


90 




LM 


.891 


IS 


117 




147 


.946 


12 


96 




109 


.982 


1 


54 




72 


.875 


r, 


61 




69 


.957 


12 


65 




80 


.963 


18 


87 




109 


963 


5 


:,.i 




60 


.917 


12 






93 


968 


IN 




11 


118 


907 


10 






81 


.93X 


4 


31 




36 


m 


30 


66 




66 


966 


19 


76 






.990 


9 


39 




49 


690 


10 


44 





i 


l 000 


7 


31 


2 






22 


138 


5 


155 


.968 


11 




3 


70 


.067 


14 




5 


LOS 


.9:. 2 


n 


108 


8 


143 


.944 


3 


7s 


3 




.904 


13 


91 


4 


108 


.963 


1" 


71 


1 


82 


.988 


13 


2* 


8 


57 


895 


IS 




H 


112 


.875 


17 


71 


7 


V, 




23 


70 


4 


17 


MS 


21 


HI 




107 


.953 


IS 


12 


10 


121 


.917 


4 


30 


1 


35 


.971 


1 


3* 


1 


3t 


.974 



77 



aECOED OF NATIONAL LEAGi B lTlvillNG. 
Record <>f those *tj" pitched fifteen <>r more fame*, arranged according 
to percentage of rictortes. 



Name and Club. 



» g 



Renlbach, Chicago 18 

Brown, Chicago i 

Leerer, Plttabnrg 

Lundgren, chlcimo 

Pfeister, Chicago 

McGlnnlty, New Sfork 1 

Overall, Cincinnati (i3)-('hicugo 
Taylor, New STorfc .... 6 

.Mjttlif\\s.>i) f New York 3 

Willis, Plttabnrg 5 

Taylor, St. Lonis (17)-Chicago \?> 

Beebe, Chicago (14)-St. Louia 14 

I'hllllpi"-. Pittsburg 2 

Wiltaie, New York 3 

Weimer, Cincinnati 13 

Scanlan, Brooklyn 

Lelfield, Plttabnrg . . M 

Lush. Philadelphia Ml 

Ames, New Ynrk 

Lynch. Pit tsbnrg 

Sparks. Philadelphia 

Swing, Cincinnati 

Drnhot. Cincinnati (4i-sr. Lonis " 

Richie, Philadelphia . 
Pittenger, Philadelphia 

Strieklett, Brooklyn 

Pastortous, Brooklyn I 

Dnggleby, Philadelphia 

Young, Boston 6 

Mclntyre, Brooklyn .,.. 

I'fcff' ,. It 

Raaon, Bi klyn 

Wicker, Chicago (10) -Cincinnati 
Lindaman, Boston ... 11 

Brown, Bt. Lonia 
Fraser, Cincinnati 

Karger. Pittaburg (t)-8t. Louli 9 

Dorner, Cincinnati (2) Boston it 

st Louis 

Th'jiiiptoU, St. Luuls ... o 



I 


3 

V 
M 


~r 


q 


- 

§ 







■ 


5 














- 




-_ 




•7. 


& 


u 


5 


— 

X 


- 


- 


fc 


92 


94 


3 


l 


1 


e 


19 


4 


.826 


u 


114 


■_' 





o 


B 


26 


6 


.813 


18 




9 







6 


82 


7 


.76J 




103 


4 


1 


II 


6 


17 


6 


,T8f 


68 




4 


4 


'1 


6 


20 


2 


.714 


71 


105 





a 





3 


27 


12 


,682 


97 


127 


7 


i 


1 


2 


16 


S 






81 


5 


•i 





9 


17 


9 


.664 


77 


128 


4 








7 


.... 


12 


.647 


76 


124 


8 


a 


1 


7 


23 


13 


.639 




81 





6 


1 


3 


20 


12 


635 


100 


171 


2 


3 





1 


15 


10 


800 




90 


6 


4 


•i 


:•: 


15 


10 


.600 


58 




8 


3 


9 


4 


16 


11 


.593 


99 


141 


7 


i 


1 


7 




14 




in 


120 


4 


1 


I 


9 


IS 


13 


. 58 ! 


»;s 


ill 


:: 


2 





* 


is 


13 




118 


161 


6 


1 





5 


18 


16 








7 


2 


1 


l 


12 


HI 




81 




-> 


1 








9 




.545 




lit 


2 


6 


1 


9 


19 


16 


.548 


no 


i r. 


10 


t 


•J 


2 


18 


14 


481 


R3 




3 


2 


It 


I 




9 


.471 


73 




9 







2 


9 


It 


.460 






1 





9 


2 


s 


10 


.444 


77 


S'S 


8 


1 





5 


If 


is 


.4:is 




58 




1 





2 


10 


14 


.417 


fifi 


S3 


a 


3 





,, 


L8 


19 


406 






9 


4 





4 


18 


2". 


.890 


Vfl 


121 


2 


s 





i 


18 


21 


.3s 2 


111 


168 


a 


1 


1 


■< 


12 


22 


371 


7f 


M 


t 


1 





:: 


i-i 


17 


.37n 






4 


II 







9 


16 








7 


2 


o 


I 


12 


23 


.842 


111 


108 


12 


2 


1 


c 


9 


19 


.333 


SO 


6K 


7 


4 





2 


10 


2n 


.333 




81 












7 


19 


. 2'*.9 


107 


108 


4 


1 





6 


8 


86 




87 


23 


4 











2 


9 


.182 




36 


1 


1 


I 


9 


| 


11 


1.4 



78 



WORLD'S CHAMPIONSHIP 
RULES AND REGULATIONS 



4k 4k 4 b> 4k $* 4k 4^ 



Governing the Contesl for the Professional Base Ball Championship of 

the World and games played between National and American League 

Clubs. Approved by the National Commission February it;. 1905, 

and adopted by the National and American Leagues, 

Februarj 10, 1909, and amended September -L', 1906. 



Ball Championship <>f 
:>> the rletorloua 

1 :i I. ill Ion. t»> bt* 

I,., selected 

the Iwiwiis 



A0j i * ment tu Play. 

Section i. The pennant-winning club of tta League aDd the 

pennant-winning club of the American League shall meet annually in a 
series of games for the Professional Base Bail Championship uf th* 

.\orld. 

The Emblem and \h mu nto. 

Bee. _. The emblem <<i the Professional 
the World shall !»»■ a pennant, i" be presented 
• u , ami ai te memento, In 

; the victorious club. Both 
by the National Commission, The cost of the pennant and 
shall in- paid by the Commission. 

To >" Piaffed Undei • n of National commission 

Sec. .:. Th( ball i*« played under the supervision^ control and 

direction of the National Commission, 

Wht n t<, he Played 

Sec. t. The prenl Bhall take place a1 tha end "f the championship 
lesson Seven games shall constitute a complete series. 

Piayin<j Rules Authorised by "'» National Agree* 

8ec. 5. i .. inducted according to the playing rules 

as provided for bj the National Agreement 

Where to u< Played 

■• National Coma ill promulga sdule r..r the 

*vent. Three games -dial) be scheduled In each <>r ih»« cities of iin* 
The Commission shall determine by bt where the ftrst 
- lines Bhall 

b game i.. decldi etwrmlne the 

city in *!. to be played. 

- flayers 
for the World's Honors shall i- 
I 
ial Commission v. ill be required t« notify all yf 
r •■ Players of th they will be held amena 

i*"i t- a'l rules ball and *lil bt subject t -> 

dlaclpUc 



^:, 



79 



When tn Terminate Winn ituj (hi ft 

Bee, 8. The clubs shall continue to plsy each Hrding tn the 
authorised schedule until one of them has won four games, when the 
sh;i!i end, and the club winning shall be entitled to By the em- 
blem or pennant of the World'8 Championship during the ensuing base 
hall season, and the playeri thereof shall tie permitted to wear the 
inento or button as long as they please. 

Right to Terminate tin £< 

see. u. The National Commission shall reserve to Itself the right to 
terminate the series at any time thai ii deemi the Interest of base ball 
demands It, and to declare one of tin- contesting clubs the winner of 
the Championship regardless of previous performances. 

Guarantee of Contesting Clubs 

Bee. 10. Bach of the Hubs participating tn the event shall guaj 
to ih«- Natloiii.1 Commission in such manner as the latter may pr< 
that they will faithfully carry -mi all of the provisions of these rules 
and regulations, and sin-h others as the Commission may hereafter make 
noes, ami thai thej will not exercise an arbitrary right 
or privilege of abandoning the series until 11 has been completed • •■ the 
Championship determined, 

l In I uij,. 

Sec. ii. There shall be two umpires, Who shall be invested with the 
authority and discretion that the playing rulea confer, and tbej 
observe the same general Instructions with reference to maintaining order 
and discipline upon the ball tiehi during these contests that govern them 

in the performance of their duties in nil th ber games in Hour re- 

spectlvi 

Umpires //""■ Beleoti <i 

s.-.- 12. The President <>f tin- National League and the president of 
the American League ^h ill each select one umpire from their respective 
leagues, ami the umpire so chosen shall be assigned t«> duty and b« 
ti. the orders of the nuiii-man of the National Comml 

i 'ompt nsation of t 'tiipii t s 

Sec. 18. The compensation 
tlonal Commission. 

Estpi uses — Hotti Adjusted 

the National Commission pertaining to these 
the salaries ot the umpires, and other miscellaneous and con- 
tingent expenses In connection therewith sh-til be paid oul of the 
to be received bj the Commission from these games. Wbould these tumls 
nsufflcienl for this purpose, the balance shall be paid out of the 
regular funds of the Commission; and should there !«■ s inrplus in 
these funds, h shall be credited each year to the regular funds of the 
Commission, All other expenses of both clubs, »uch us hotel bills ami 
traveliug exi>enses, bulls, advertising, policing of grounds, tickei sellers 
and takers, incidentals, etc., shall be paid bj the club Incurring the 
■sine Should any difference Bny time as t<> the latter expense, 

tin- same shall i»<- submitted to Mm Commission for adjudication, and its 
finding shall be conclusive 

' tu tlonal Rights of the Clubs 

bib shall i»re* I • 
upon its own gt 



»f the umpires shall be fixed by the n«- 



1 "ii Its 
duel ol Iti buslu< 

| llOU i <l !' 

to i 
Provided, however, that the csptain 

-l id not in- Bceorded the privilege to determine \\ Ii 

umpire 



■ amis with 
t j . ■ 1 1 therewith 
right* a mi what< 

! th 



Ights 
reference to ih- 

but the vi-.lmr i bit, 

m-i representation and 
Interests of the club 

f tin- homi 

tii.-i tin- grounds 
it tbej fall to 



80 






nprre, th»> umpir- whose turn It is to officiate behind the plate will 
decide as to Ore condition of the ground. 

Rates of A (I in is 

Sec. L6. 'i he rates of admission and the conditions governing the same 
shall be died by and be under the control of the National Commission, 

Division of Receipt* 

See. IT. The receipts from the games shall be divided as- follows: 

first. Ten (10) per cent. shall 

be paid to the National Commissi 

Second, sixty (60) per cent, of the balance from the Oral four games 
shall form b pool for the players of the two be divided 

seventy-five (75) per cent to the winner and twci 25) per cent 

to the loser of the < onteat 

Third. After the ten (10 deductions for the Commission, 

and the sixty (60) per cent, which Conns ihe players' pool from the first 
roar games, the balance of th,- gross receipts shall be divided equally 
between the two clnbs. 

Fourth. The amount to be paid Into tin- players 1 pool as provided by 
this section shall be paid to the Commission, and the same shall be 
distributed to the players throua •mmiaaion. 

Adjustment of Salaries After the Contract Se< 

18. in Hi" event thai the schedule for a World'! Championship 
series extends beyond tin- players 1 en the salaries of 

tli" players who properly belong to the contesting clubs shall continue, 
fit tie- contract rate, to \U- end of ? • led, al- 

though only four or more games be played. 

tided 
See. 19. The free list shall h»- during th.- i 

: the press and club officials of the tw< 

latUm of Pennant and Buttons 

20, The pennant ami buttons shall b be victorious 

•bill and iis players, each tionsl Commission whbh is 

authorized to arrange for ail of the d< tatlon. 

Disputes to be Settled ty the Commi 

mi questions arising out of the playing for the World"* 
( hamplonship nut provided t»v herein nor ■ lie playing rules 

shall be dealt with and decided by u.- National Commi 

-i// Clubs to tgree to these Conditions 
See. 22. All clubs of both leagues hereby lutely to conform 

i" all tb< des, ami in any cases not herein 

to ipply to Othet (fames 

ail other games played be- 

rial and American Leaf ipon application being made 

to the National I .• ,,f th.- i 

.■v.- .ism- .,t the amount to be paid to the National Commission, which 

M,i ' 11 oe mutually agreed upon between tin tlctpatlng In inch 

til bi- paid at tl 

ft r the 
expiration of their eontt 

Notified 

National and 
American leagues, cop 
live leagues and sent to the 

w-toro the loth of liarch Of ■-, mail a | 



%&% 











' 






3 


B 








c 








c 






s 


5 


U 



1^ 

I! 



6 I 






J3 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE KALI, »;riDE. 



WHAT A BASE BALL 
PLAYER NEEDS 



4 k $* $ k> $* 4h> <& 4k 



A Base Ball player needs an outfit that plays with him, noi against 
him, and we hi reckon In the outfit as the moat Important 

articles the Balls. Bate, Mitts and Glovee thai the player uses. 
After th:it we have go1 to consider the uniforms and then the arti- 
cles making up the •-•in ii 'iii*-n t of the irrounds. 




For orer • ! Q. SpaldJ idying 

to please the athlefc 

uius! suitable t rt that he is Intere ted li pullea 

noi «.j,]> • the gei era! line of athletic 

r quipment. 



LDING'S OFFICIAL HASH KALI, QUIDS. 



.' up the •■ '■-■ of the Base Ball player the ball - 

'Flu- Spalding Official League Ball ha i\ by iii.- 

National League, Minor Leagues, and by all intercollegiate and other 

over a qua century, and is beyond all q 

tlon the mosl perfecl Base Ball thai ■ produced, it is 

put out with an absolute guarantee to last through one continual 
b game withoul losing Its shape. The price of the Spalding 
Official League Base Ball Is 81.25 each and it is carried Ln stock ana 
sola by dealers throughout the i total of over 30*000 who 

le the Spalding line of athletic goods. 

a ball that calls Cor the consider- 
ation of clubs that u ant a ball that 
is regulation In every way. out 
somewhat more durable than the 
regular Official League Ball, is the 
Spalding Double Seam STo. 0, the 
each. This 
ball is made with the same can 
rial as the 
•i League Hall, and the double 
stitch renders it doublj ..M<ur« 




For h : 

flcial The price of ilm 

ball Is >r and in * 






•I TIi'lAL BASE BALL Gl.'lhi:. 

reaped is the same as the Official League Ball except that it is 
slightly smaller in size 

To satisfy the demand fur a 1j i trit grade ball ai good as any so 
called "League* 1 balls made In Imitation of tin- Spalding Official 
League hail, the No. x 'Varsity League Ball baa been pul out by 
Bpalillng, and the pile,, of this ball la $1.00 each, a new full 
ball has been added to the Spalding line this season,; this la the 
Spalding No. IA Amateur League, made with the horsehlde cover and 
of excellenl material throughout; price 76 cents. Other targe slse 
halls in the Spalding line are the No. 2, Professional, 50 c 

Ing of Hi.- Diamond, 25 cents: No, 7. Boys' Favorite, 20 cents; 
ho 8, 10 cents. The other special balls Included in the Spalding 
line for boys' use Mini slightly smaller than regulation size are No 
XI'.. [nterscholastlc League, BO cents; No. 10, High flyer, 25 cents; 
No. 7B, League Junior, 25 cents; No. 14, Boys' Amateur, l r» cents; 
No. 9B, Boys' Lively, 10 cents; No. i:;. Roek< ts, All nf 

these Base Balls are well made. The Quality of material throughout 

cellenl and the sewing and other details <<f manufacture are all 
attended t<< in mir own factory ander the dlreci supervision ol 
peri Base Ball players through whose bands every ball passes before 
it is |int ..in for 
a Base Ball Ba1 In these 'lays has goi to be something more than 

a sties of \\ i whittled out by the boj himself, or a convenient 

broom handle sawed off to the proper length. A Spalding Base Ball 
Ba1 means a scientific article of Base r.aN play: something thai has 
bad tin- consideration of men who know iusl wbal Is required by a 
Base hail player and who have bad ai their disposal the nneqn 
facilities of urn* manufacturing establisbmenl to produce h ba1 thai 
is just right. The demand for Base Ball bats has been so great at 
times as t«. tax to tin- ntmost the facilities of tin- Spalding factory, 
but thai baa never led us to take from our drying sheds, timber noi 
sufficiently seasoned We have made certain In every case bef< 
stick of timber was taken oui of th«* drying shed thai li bad bees 
pr.iji.Tlv s. . us t.» give the necessary driving power required 

in a has.- Ball Bat thai la to be just right, and then after the 
stick of timber has be*?n turned over to the batmaker. who is to turn 
it out, it needs his practiced eye and the knowledge thai he has 
en during all the rears thai be has been supervising the manu- 
facture of Spalding bats to teii him just what model that particular 
mould be made, to utilize to iiie fullest extenl the good points iu- 
bereni in the superb timber to which so much and trouble 

has already been attached. 

turn a piece "f timber that is just rlghl over to a man 

wh«. does nol know whal is required In 11 Bat, and al- 

i show him the model of what yon need, 11 does noi follow 

that be will give you a ba1 thai will b< M needs a 

certain special knowledge to turn out a bai thai la properly balanced, 

with the weighi Iusl In the rlghl place, the grip just the right 

shape ami the length proper, ana it is this special knowledge which 

these batmakers have acquired through their long connection with a. 

<;. Spalding & Bros., m turning out the superb line of Base Ball 

• (i at the Spalding bai factory. 

The Spalding Gold Medal Bats, in men' made In three 

different styles, No. GM, plain, white wax finish; No. GMT, taped bat: 

■ Ml', professional, speelal dark finish. These three hats all sell 
at the same price, $1.00 each, and in the sane- quality is made a 
boy's size bat. No. GMB, the price of wh!< ents each. The 

special second growtl In the Gold Medal 11 

is the imber thai can t» boughi 

bere at any price. Tin- same mber is used in the 

Spalding Mushroom R lifferent s1 made. 

No If. plain, special finish, and No. MT. with taped handle. The 
ith «.r ih-- -. $1.00 each, The knob 

emeni at the end of the Spalding Mushroom Bata gives a more 
even distribution of weighi over the whole length than I 

onder >i id • ti I play the t 

luable. Mr. Charles A, Coraiskey, I'realdeul oi the 



d 



SPALDING'S OFFICIA! ALL GUIDE. 



Chicago American Leagui 
Bpaldio torn i'«i 

i hall play 

good qualities. ' Ami th 
.■■ < Hub, champions i 
John Bvers, Joe Tinket 
our expert 



rink Champion* of the World, says "The 
receives mj bearty endorsement . M i 

tblea in- i" thoroughly appreciate its 

ie following playera on the Chicago National 

.f the National League in I'.hm;, F, U Chance, 

i ■'. Slagle and J, tiling, aaj . "in all 

Ball players we have nm found a bal more 




GOLD MKDAL BATS. 



MUSH] 



TRADE WLAKK : 



factory than the Spald Tin- opinio 

.1. McGraw Manager of the New \ til Club, of this hat 

■ himI a bal 
thai would balanci when 'choking.' Noi until I used tlm Spalding 
Mushroom Ba1 bare I found a bal I np to my Id 

And William 
Olcason, of tbe Philadelphia National Loague Club, Baya "I hare 
played profeaaiunal Base Ball fin tb< -n««i have tried 



>FFICIAL BASE BALL <:riDE. 



nil kinds of hats, bnl do ba1 has given m \a tin- 

Spaldinj mi Bat. Quality and balance arc pert 

the Spalding tine of I tin laden the 

A. (}. Spalding Atitogranh" Bat, 75 crentn each 

tie, lull jia ree, with tape- 

wound handle, 35 cents; the No. 2X, full size bat, 25 cent* 
following boys' size bats: No, ;JX, Junior League. 25 cents; 
2XB, antique finish, 10 < ents. 

Hmw much tt Base Ball catcher owes i-» a proper!; made miti w> 
one but iii> can tell. Spalding knows, however, how to make a mitt 
; aid in til- catcher. They have studied 
this point for years, They are continually experimenting and they 
claim thai the result of their study anil i shown in 

what tder th.> Spalding perfect I Ball Mitt 

catchers, basemen and fielders. They spend a great amount yearly 
in Investigating Improved tanning p Ir factory 

maintain an expensive department devoted wholly i«- the one object 
of Improving the construction of their goods. in e i in* 

Spalding mitts the best materia] obtainable is used, This not only 
applies in the leather but also to the padding, the thread in the 
stitching, ■ ongs, and ■ imall detail in 

the manufacturing problem. 





No. 
Spalding .Mm. 



No. B-O 

This is the w No 

patent im.iiieij I on to old time 

players when pal oi ok tike wildfire. For the 

■ i this mitt only »if choicest pa ich hide are selected. 

The leather must be perfectly tanned peculiar stitch- 





No. 7-0 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASF-; HALL GUIDE. 



md the molding; process which Is necessary to produce a perfect 

• i" with no seams or rough pi my kind on the face. 

mitt is padded with besl felt, has steel wire Lacing and s 

leather strap and brass buckle fastening at back. Hie price of tin- 

Spalding No. 9-0 Miit li $& >acb The next grade 1- the Spalding 

no. 8-0, Professional Style, with fa< t v\liit< i buck and absolutely 

best s>rade material throughout. The price of the No. 8-0 Edit 

1 each. The Spalding No. 7-0 Mitt, which bat mown 





No. 8— Scoop No. 5-0 

generally as the "Perfection," eh. It la of finest an 

mi and has double row of stitching <>n heel pad. Spalding 





No. OX No. O 

milar mitt to the Dumber >f black Leather sod 

without heel pad. This 1 the Spalding No. 7 O-B 

1 each. 








No.OA 



Nd A 



■ ITU [AL BASE BALL lil IM.. 



In passing wi would 1 i U ■ • to mention the new Spalding s< i> Mitt, 

combining the. g l points of the baseman's pat- 
tern with ' the Large 81 mitl now in u The 
scoop Is ~t Iffened with I er, giving fall i 
of iin- Bngers, and as there is no strain at all on the face, there Is 
no danger of injury to « I ■ - - lliunib. 

Mitt is 110.00. An •.!.) favorite is the Spalding League Mitt, No, 
.00 each. This is an excellent article, v.-n made and 




No. B No. 4 

popular with som > of 1 i his, The 

Spaldi 

piece athei on ' tertion to tin* i 

and i well mad* ! """' 

full size - mitts In thi Miu. 





BB 

B Mif. | 
All rif ' 

made to lit mmi. 1 1 u '" r 

the broad Spalding Ruaran >lln *| 

for cat • i' 1 " 1 










made 




w^^ 



SPALDING'S OFFN tAL BASE BALL 01 
the No, BB fcfltl o rerj popnlii and Ibe 

Ills. 

When it | ,„i ni .,i M j. 

i ttiut do mil enter Into the construction •>■ 
I ateber'n Mm A B i ■„ pllabli . be o1 

i protection, in addition to this thei 
other qualitii h thai cannol ll|11sl 

!,| i enter into tin tlon ol the Baseman's Mm which is I 




No. I 

T |j 

and uimi i miit thai 
Firs! Bi 



No. DX No. CX 

baaei 
«Mi help tnelr play. The Spalding line "f 

in llH'ludi'8 :ill of Hi. 



IOW t'hNl I..I- inch on tin- 

inu iniii^ almost unlvei ■ line Includes the Spaldii 

i'. x. be at qua lity, mad< 






No. No. 

tl of blaeh leather 

lli«- tlotlbl< 

j 11 " 1 ll I the 

'"•I pail, lui , 

Of I! 












LDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL Gl 

.1 coinprehem Ive lin< 
diffei from both md Catebei Lneor 

porating In then Bturea which make them particularly 

attra in the Held. I be beal 

Fielder's Mitt is the No. 3C, made of molded br 




No. 6X. 






No. 7X. 



lined, and Btrap-and-buckle fastening at hack. The pi No. 

3C is |3.00 each. A slmilfl Mitt, but made of black leather, 

is the Spalding No. 3XH hut 

Hunt.- of whit*' tanned buckskin, the Spa Id ■■. A 
le of Fielder's Mitt, of drab teatlu 




No. PX. 



No. RX. 



Spalding N". f v - 

o dlfferenl 
•>\, of brown - • 
tanned Leather, at 






No. 2XS 



No. AX. 



No. XS. 



u itii 

suited to iu-> band, b 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



ability n the 

. in the manufacture of everything relatiug to the 
• ■!! Spalding an • al no 

■ •. can buy. The training thai fine people in iiu- Spalding 

linn- they have been turning ou1 






No. XL, 



No. X. 



No. 13. 



Spalding 11 -is la worth more to the Bas« Ball player who 

purchases the Spalding article than • ■■ for the 

pari of the value of the Spa 
thai value is contain broad 







No. 15. 






No. 16. 



ftven with 
broader. ! t"'i given 

Us ai 

tliri; 




No. P No. 1-L No. No. If, 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE, 



pecially w b< n M is remembered thai 11 The line 

of Spalding i « j 1 1. !<!.■; .- ' Gloves comprises styles suitable for every class 
of player, Tin it is the Spalding No. I'X 

lonal Style, al *.:.<»>. This Is made up on line d by 

promfnenl prof essionu 1 players, and the buckskin used In Its con 
Btrnction i- the ftnesl Spalding 1ms been able to obtain anywhere n 
is heavily padded around edges and extending well up Into the 
uiih flue quality felt, ir has no heel pad, but Is made i 
to protect the wrist, a similar glove, bul made of black 
leather, is the Spalding No. Itx. price of which is .<::.< m \ yi . lv 
popular style which has retained its popularity during the great 
mauy years that been manufacturing it is the No 2X ln- 

the price of which is JK tiding makes a 

tial style glove, No. 2 . 50. a popular price 

Slove in the professional style is the Spalding No. XL, at $1.60 
u " 1 ' heel !':'<! made of white tanned leather The Spalding No. Xs 

od value. The other full si/..- glov< 
Spalding llni e 

P i i ,"•• '■ rI - 

included m tin- Spalding lint- are a number <■!' youths' size. 

wmch an- well made of the same material as that used In the men's 

■■ » u made in tin- proper si/.,- and in ti orreci shape for 

youths an. I boys, Theae are ih.- No. PXB Glove, similar in every 

rx best men's glove, but in h The PXB 

* each. The next grade is the No. XB, In boy's size. 

similar in quality to the No. x. tin- No. xr, costs fl.OO. A special 

e No. IT which 
its, and the <ii.Mi.-st boy's ■ No 19 at 26 i 




require an artieh 
: >i that 
It. Spalding has 
catcher In ti 



the 



No. 4-0 No, 3-q No. 2-0 

When it ■ i; ;i ]| }•..,.. 

that will give full protection, that will noi be i 
will feel comfort) 

requirements of the B 

ilding lin.- 

I 0, Sun 

League 
the patent 

neck 
I be No. 
iritfa catchers on big 
black 
\ popular 
made 
mask 
•yV masks Spalding a 



Mask. 



[.•<!. 



jpMBi 



SrALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALI 





L. 
Ball Masks tli is season a 



No. 0. 
idded to the lii • 
le »"<■!• umpires. A mask for umpires baa I 
tremely necessary pari «.f their equipment and th. new Spalding 
style -•unit. kims the most deairable features of the beat catchers 1 
masks with the special points m for the umpire. This mask 

lias a special ear protection, is u.-u 
padded, and on the whole Is the si I 

while a1 the same i fmi 

hi than the regular catch 
tiding No. 
>s1 of which is |5.(] ach. 





No. B. No. C. No. 1). 

Bpelding was the first to Introduce an Inflated body protector made 

under the Graj Patent aid tin- method u>>>\ when the first Spalding 

put out has been retained up to the present, with 

some Improvements which add to the comfort ai m f the 

,..,,,}.. ■ before in tin- 

Spalding line now, offering a « Idlng 

ring full protection, 
the popular League style. 
$!i(X)each; No, I, Amatem -i ■> no, m. Interseholastic 

and full ; each. 

Hnaldlng al protectors. 

\n ..f iti,- umpire body p I the 

Individual wishes of the umpire and it Is m ng to 

be made and bow wide it It 
ing the 
make <■> rtaln of a proper tit The two 



Spalding PUtS 

and i|,. 



i. lit Hi: iv (111' 

una 11 si/.-. ■ | 1 1 1 



nrnpln- body protectoi 

■ lO.(M), 

\ i*...^- Ball team renllj I not 

fitted up the Individual tint 

id to do this t 1 



SPALIHN';-s OFFTGIAL BASE BA1 



should be eonsfi and of the* • dif 

feren' --. <.f <-\ i ra qua and quilted 

$6.00 per sit of iti-t' No. I noi quilted, $6.00 pel 




No. S No. 2 

alho ..f eai 

«Hff» •' 

with league regulations, a;. the No. 1. madi 



J 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



extra One white rubber, The price of the No. i Borne Plal 
each. Spalding also baa a vn-.v durable style of bom< plate made 
of composition, regulation size and shape. This la the No. «'. which 
coats $5.00 complete with inns. In the Pitcher's Bos Plates Spalding 

the regnlal made of white rubber complete with pins. 

is the No. • each, Foul Fla I hunting. 18x24 

i # in anj color and with one letter stitched on each side, com' 
plete with 7-foot spearhead staff, eo ach. Whei 

to Shoe Platea the ra that use Spalding shoes recognise 

i in- value that there Is In Spalding Shoe r- 
of the very best material, and will give excellent satiafaction, 
Btylea furnished by Spalding are the No, 3-0 and No. W>, toe and 
heel plates, respectively, of razor steel, sharpened, uhirh coat 50 
cents per pair. The No, and No. 2-0 toe and heel plates, reapec- 
tlv. ly, made of hardened steel, sharpened, at 26 cents per pair, and 
the No, i and No, ill. toe and heel platea, respectively, of good 
quality steel, sharpened, al LO cents per pair. Then Spalding has 
the Pitcher's Toe Plates, No, A, made of aluminum, at 25 cents, 
and No. B, B o 28 cents. 

Starting <u, their trip, or even if they have do traveling to do, 
it is generally Cor a Base Ball team to bare a hiin iu. 

whirl! the equipment of bata may be carried and in iht- Spalding 
line will be found bat baga to meet their requirements. The No, 2 
style will imid tweli I heavy waterproof canvas and 

leather reinforced, co No. 3 Btvle, similar to the 

2, but to hold on 2.00 each. For League clubs 

particularly and for clubs having a schedule requiring any amount of 
traveling, Spalding has a apecial club bat bag of heavy leather with 
galvanized Iron enda, No< 7. the price of which This bag 

holds three dozen full si-/..' bata and it la made so strong that it it 
absolutely unbreakable, making certain that the hats and the l»u>f 
will reach their destination wifely, do matter how the bag is handled. 

individual players sometimes i d ba1 bags for their own particular 

hats and Spalding makea three styles of Individual bat bags, No. 01, 
of sole leather, to hold tw< I $4.00; No. 02, of heavy water- 

proof canvas, with leather cap at both end 

with leath< ' nni- 

Corm and bat bag is a popular style, it. will bold a complete uni- 
form and has a compartment also to bat. u is made <»f 
best canvas and coata $3.00. .\u Individual uniform bag that 

convenient shape and is popnlar with many players is tin* 
Spalding No. 4 quality white canvas with 

leather bai trap-and-buckle I Th» mil form 

of uniform bag is the style thai enables a player to carry his uniform 
without wrinkling it. Spalding maki ! <-f uniform baga in 

this f'-rm; No. l. of beat rta $3.00, and No. 2, of tin.- bag 

leather, coats $<;.mi. 

e mad.- in a great variety but n club tiiat 

wishes to keep the record ->f their games In proper shape pnrcha • 
Spalding Bcore book, which d by tin- official re- 

portera, and are the moat convenient and simplest for genera] use. 
Club size, with 1 ts $1.00; No 

u ith cloth cover, for 80 . I the No. T, with 

cloth 160 gam* 0. In pocket aize, th.- No, 2. 

with board cover, for and the No. i, with 

papei ! 28 cents 

the urn pin article is n celluloid 

Indicator, by which he can ord, wlthoul any trouble, of tin- 

hulls and sirii,. nptre Indicator No. coata 

• mil-, made and all 

League umpires ther simple device u the 

Spalding Scoring Tablet, made of celluloid rise so that u 

Met Ni>. I 
cunt-. . 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE. 



WHAT A BASE BALL PLAYER 
SHOULD WEAR 



tft -A tft tfr xfr xflk tflk 

*w «w »w «■$•> »w *$y «iw 



a Mast- Hall player, in ih.> eyes ->f the sj tators at in. .st games, 

is a hero. They would all like to be able to play as well as ii*- does. 
ill- seems to possess in their eyes attributes that an- different from 
the ordinary run <-f men. is It not well, therefore, that this man, 
who is regarded as a hero, should appear before these who admire 
him in tin' best possible manner? He can only do so if he has mi a 
neat uniform ami is equipped as a Base Ball player should in-: in an 
outfit Hint is suitable for the game lie is playing. After the experi- 
ence of thirty years and over in catering to Base Ball players. Spalding 
knows pretty accurately whal they re. [Hire, and thai is why newly 
organized teams go there in ever-increasing numbers to ask for advice 
as t«> the outfit that they should purchase, Spalding d i nut recom- 
mend tu a young team an expensive outfll thai would be suitable for 
a team on one "f tiit- big leagues. Spalding lias outfits to snit teams 
connected with the prominenl leagues, outfits for school and college 
teams, outfits for the semi-professiona] clubs, and still other outfits 
f,,r th« amateur clubs, and for tin- club composed of young 
boys who are ambitious to make as good a Bhowlng as possible and 
yet are n»t able t-» purchase the higher-priced uniforms. In fact, 
this season Spalding has gotten up a special Keys 1 niform that you 

will tind listed in the Spalding Catalogue at 81. »ch. It would 

not !• to furnish it at this [lie,- if it were not on account 

of tlie unequaled Spalding factory facilities. 

The best grade Spalding Uniform is the No. f>, which sells complete 
In single uniforms for *lo.<xi, hut where clubs purchase an entire 
outfit at one lime the price is |12.50 per suit. No extra charge is 
mad*' for lettering shirts with name <>f <"iuh nor for detachable sleeves, 
and striped stockings in stock colors are furnished at no extra charge, 
if pn in Btockings. if Bpeeia] colors are required 

in these striped siurkii,^, however, an extra el. . .,.|,is p^r 

pair is made, Jo cover the extra • This bighesl grade uniform 

ia furnished in thirteen different colorB, Including three special 

terns whieh have been added to tin- line this season, and which are 

different from anything eve* used before in a Base Ball Uniform. 
These special patterns include a \->-ry handsome red stripe, a green 
stripe and an attractive navy blue check. The regular line of plain 
colors include the following ten patterns, which are similar to i 
Spalding has been furnishing in this grade uniform for the past 
few years. 

The next uniform in the Spalding line is similar to the No. u, 
hut lighter in weight, ami is furnished in the same thirteen colors. 
This is the University Uniform, No. 1, price of which in ilngie suits 
is $12,60 each, and when purchased b1 mplete club 

outfit, nine players or more, Mn- pi 

Tim next grade uniform is the In-- Uniform, No. 2, In 

which the three new patterns an- in-t furnished, only the t.-n plain 

colors, similar in shade to the plain colors furnished in the No. o ami 

i. Th.- price for this uniform complete, purchased singly, is 

$io.<>> each, and mplete club outfit, nine uniforms or more, 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL 1BASE BALL GUIDE. 



the price is $8.00 each. No extra charge for Lettering .shirts with 
name of Hub nor for detachable sleeves will be made on either the 
N". l or No. 12 grade uniforms, and striped stockings in stock colors 
will be furnished at no extra charge, where special colors Ln striped 
stockings are required, an extra charge for same <>n an order for an 
entire beam will i»* 25 cents per pair, to covet expense of getting out 
the special color. 

Spalding has on hand a special Bannel, royal purple, dyed particu- 
larly for trams connected with the Order of Fiks, and while It is 
not recommended that this be made up In solid color In suits, still it 
makes a beautiful combination as trimming on white flannel, and 
uniforms in tin- No. 1 and No, 2 qualities only can be trimmed with 
this purple trimming at no extra charge, 

For the past season Spalding lias been furnishing to some of the 
more prominent of the minor league teams on special order a heavy 
weight uniform made «>f \<-vy durable material and in attractive 
colors. The demand was Increasing so much for this uniform that 
this season it is added to the regular line, and this is now known 
as the No, M Minor League Uniform. The price for single uniforms 
is $©.00 each, and to clubs ordering for the entire team the price is 
$7.50 each. The uniform is furnished in four different colors: Navy 
Blue. Pearl Gray, Dark Gray and White only. No extra charge is 
made for lettering shirts with name of club nor for detachable sleeves 
and striped stoekintxs in stock colors will be furnished at DO extra 
charge, and for any special colors on an order for an entire team tie- 
extra charge for striped stockings will be !!."> cents per pair. 

amateur teams we recommend particularly the Spalding "Club 
Special," No. :;. Dniform, the price of which In single uniforms in 
86.00 per sum. and the net price to clubs ordering for an entire team, 
$5.00 per suit. This uniform is furnished in Ave different colors: 

White, Blue Gray, Maroon. Navy Blue and Bn.uii Gray. No extra 

charge will be made for lettering shirts with name of club nor for de- 
tachable sleeves, and striped stockings in stock colors will he fur- 
nished at no extra charge, If desired. Special colored striped 
stockings on team outfits will be charged for extra at 25 cents per 
pair, to cover cost of special Btrlplng. 

For the founger Base I'.all players we recommend particularly the 
"Amateur Special" Dniform, No. -i, the price of which in single 
tiis is |5.00 per suit, and to clubs ordering for an entire team. $4.00 
per suit. This uniform is furnished in *ix different colors: White. 
Light Gray, Maroon, Navy Fine and Green. No extra charge is made 
[■<»■ lettering shirts with name of club nor for detachable sleeves, ami 
striped stockings will be furnished In stork colors only, at no extra 
charge, but no special striped stockings will be furnished with this 

uniform. 

A cheaper grade uniform for youths is the Spalding "Junior," No. 5, 
furnished in four colors: Maroon, Green, Blue Gray ami Brown Ml 

and the pri .f which in single outfits is $4.00 per suit, and to dul.s 

ordering nine or more uniforms. |3.00 per suit. No extra charge for 
lettering shirts with name of dub nor for detachable sleeves, and 
with this uniform also striped stockings in stork colors only will be 
furnished at do extra charge, hut no striped stockings will be fur- 
nished except in stock colors. 

The special uniform that has been gotten up this season by Spald- 
ing for the younger players is ih- No, 6 quality, made of gray 
material, hut in no larger sizes Hum 30-incb waist and 34-lncb chest. 
of (his uniform is |1.00, Including shirt, button front, with 
one felt letter on front, padded pants, peak cap, web heit with metal 

buckle, and either plain or striped stockings in StOCK colors only. 
With SUCh a uniform there is really DO eXCUSC for any club QOt to he 

htted out complete, for the price la wdi within the reach of the 
pocket boo k of practically any Base Ball player or team. 

Base Ball players are coming to use more and more double breasted 
coats and rest-shaped sweater*. They add a good deal to the ap- 
pearance of a Base Ball outfit. Spalding makes double-breasted coats 
in four different qualities to match the four hem grades of Spalding 
Duiforma. The No. o quality coats cost, singly, $10.60, or with set of 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL <;CIDE. 



Hiiif"! ims «f tiitu' or i 1 1 eluli I" i 

s'.'.r ach. to the n<>. I quality, pr r rhe single eoal Is $1 

or to clubs purchasing with uniforms or with nine or more coats al 
one tiun> $9.00. r i lie No. 2 quality, singly, costs $8.50, or vrith set ol 

uniforms or uiur or more coats al one time the price is $7.E ach. 

The No. .M quality, purchased singly, costs i I ol 

uniforms or when purchasing nine or more eoata a1 one time the priee 
la $7.jU each. 





No. O. No. VG. 

The Spalding fesl Sweater, No. VQ, is very popular with Base Rail 
players, it is made of best quality worsted, heavy weight, with pearl 
buttons, and is furnished In Gray or White only. Special trimmed 
edging and cuffs in stock colors win be supplied <>n ter at 

do extra charge. The price for the No, v<; sweater is $6.00 

Prom time to time h is necessary for players to purchase Base 

Ball Shirts and Pants separately. The prices for Spalding Has.- Hull 

shirts lettered with name of dub and with detachable sleeves if 

desired, are as follows: No. 0, best quality, $6,00 each; No, i. Dnl- 

.-..im» each; No- 2, [nterscholastic, $4,00 each; N.». B, 

Club Special, $2.50 each; No. 1, Amateur Special $2. ach; No 

Junior Shirt, $1.60 each. 

The prices f«>i' the Base Ball Pants purchased separately an 
follows: No, it quality. $6.00 per pair; No. i. university style, 
$5.00 per pair; No. 2. interscholastic. $3.75 per pair: No. 8, Club 
Special, $2.50 per pair; No. I. Amateur Special, $2.00 per pair, No. 
5, Junior Pants, $1.50 per pair. 

Wh.-n it . ■oiiM-s to Base Ball Shoes there Is really do part of the 
outfit to which greater care simuM be devoted than in making the 
proper selection. If thu shoes are nut right the player will not be 





2-0. 30S. 

comfortable and be will nut play bis besi game. Spalding baa de- 

I no end >>( time and trouble i" working oul are 

absolutely righl Cor Ball player, in « in- Spalding highest 

three different styles, from which the mo 
player ma to selecl Bhoea that will answer his particular 

requirements. The Spaldii *boes have been Kih.um as the 

".Spalding High. for yean past, and thej w.-u <j. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASU BALL GUIDE. 



that title. This shoe is made of specially selected Kangaroo teal 
• 1 1.\ bench made shoe; that is, it is made by ai 
cobbler, all band work, and as well made as it is possible to 

The plates used on this shoe are of the fin< 
and they are firmly riveted to hold the sole, in every dt 
this shoe is absolutely best. Prom tin- fad (imt it is worn bj 
players of all the big leas Is pretty good evidence thai it. 

is made right. The "Spalding Highest Quality" Base Ball Shot 
known as tin.- No, li-o, and the price is .$7.00 per pair. 





No. FW. 



No. O. 



Some time back Spalding got ni> specially for prominent league 
players a Sprinting Base lt:ill Shoe. For Mils the famous Spalding 

Running Shoe last, from which the s] s have been made for all the 

ram. mis sprinters, is used. The element of strength is not sacrificed 
however, and the Spalding No. 308, while extremely light in weight, 
will be found substantial in construction, it Is hand sewed through- 
out and I* strictly a bench-made si , made by expert cobblers In 

the Spalding factory. The Spalding No. 308 Shoe costs $7.00 per 
pair. 

ro seasons ago there was a demand for even HjrhtiT weight 
Sprinting Shoes than the No. 80S, and after considerable experi- 
menting, Hi" Spalding "Feather Weight" Base Ball Shoe, No. FW, 
which is the lightesl Base Ball Shoe ever made, was gotten up. To 
give an Idea as to the Lightness of this shoe, we note below the weigbl 
of five of the principal sizes: Size 5 weighs 17 ounces to the pair: 
Size 8 weighs 17 1-2 ounces; Size 7 weighs 18 ounces; Size 8 weighs 
19 ounces; Size 8 weighs 20 ounces. Owing to the tightness and 
Oneness of Its construction, it. is suitable for tho exacting demands 





No. 35. 



No. 37. 



of H players and is no1 Intended f«T general nse or for the 

ordlm ■ is the same as the other two styles In 

i in- Spalding hi. rtctly bench-made shoe. It 

per pair. 

Ball player who requl b1 and .it 

i fad in i. ■ ommend tin Spalding Club Special Shoe, \ 

the price of which Is 16.00 per pair it la m calf 

skin. •• d Is a flrsl 

cular. We also recommend the Spalding > .<i.hm 



SPALDING'S OFFU 1AL BASE BALL 



per pair, rhis good quality calfskin, machii 

and is a darah i . be Spalding "Junior*' Shoe 

feather ah : tin* pricj - per pair, it is Dot guaranteed, but 

is good > Blue I 

Ankle Supporters which are worn i,\ son,.- f the Ball 

players are furnished bj Spalding in three different styles Thei can 
be worn either over or under stocking, and Bupporl the ankle without 
Interfering with ements. They relieve pain Immediately and 

cure the pain In a remarkably short time. The No, Jl Ankle Sop- 
porter, made of soft tanned leather, besl quali |1.00 per 
pair. No. sii. made ol sheepskin, costs 50 .•••us pet pair, and 
i ll. made of black <lurk. >■, p,.,- pair. 

Every neeessarj article for the B player will be found 

lisn-.i in the Spalding Ua*- Ball Catalogue, a copy of which will be 
sent on application m any Spalding Store, free of chs . 
Ball players as are interested also In other athletic bouM 

mention thi en they write for a ci • Spalding i 

ogne, s " that they may receive all of the catalogues th:u thej 
interested In. The Spalding Catalogues thai win u- Issued foi 
spring and Summer season of 1907 are: 

Base Ball Catalogue Containing cuts, descriptions and price of the 
compete ine ..i Spalding Base Ball Goods. This Is a *erj bind- 
some catalogue printed In two colors, and Bhould be in the , 
or even Baac Ball player. Spalding Lawn Tennis Catalogue i 
Mining cuts, description ami pi complete line c»f Spalding 

1 ' : ' W, 1 '. [, ' l! ding Golf i Containing 

fcription and prices of Spalding Goli • Balls and othei 

" n, ' s 1 '"»' Spalding Catali m, Games The 

raost <-"ini' "i<- H-' Issued of the equipment l 
Bowls, Field Hockey, Archery. Equestriau Polo, i 

Hon when you send to Spalding for h catalogue lust what athletic 

that the proper catalogue maj be 

s.'iit to you. 

Managers and I Base Ball teams who desire to place is 

a complete club outfit, should not fail to consult the 
nearest Spalding . whIrn M 

\. G. Spalding i .,[ ,,f the new 

Ball manager or captain, is worth a when it • 

liable outfit for the team 
A spcclul colon-d • inn- 

renal furnished In all grad< ug Cnlforms. will be s.-ut 

"" '■'• II Team Mi Itb It 

a special mi 

[at of Spalding stores, witl 
Philadelphia 101 treet 

SSttE nrp * H?' 

•■ll Main Street. 

I 10 Wood ' 

ingtim. i». t\ im i i- »1orado Butt 

I ' 

Denver Col MHO a • 

. Mo, 111 
} n " »uth. 

•Jevelaiid 741 Ku< lid Kvt 

Mom 

London, Bi 






. 



I 



Spalding catalogues of Athletic Goods 

We are Issuing ru illy throughout the entire • 

containing all Information, c ption and prices of the full 

equipment for the particular athli 

Wc mail them 

to any 

here are gei new things contained 

in tie particularly 

athlete and e v er yon e h m athletic g 

ours. It i< only I • iddxeSS at ••: I what 

athletic tporti yon in* and copies of our ca1 ill be mailed 

to you as they are issued. 

Spalding Catalogues for Spring and Summer, 1 907 

No. 707B Catalogue of Base Ball Goods 

A handsome catalogs in two colors, Containing cv 

and prices of the Spalding complete li ■ Ball Goodi 

halls, b hers' 

and un uniform bai 

hoc and pitchers' toe plat "<>ks and m 

and foul tlaR-s, 

I'd—' 

Spali 1 1 U Uniform 

letk libraries we issue 

devot- bsJL 

No. 707T Lawn Tennis Catalogue 

>f the Spalding complete line of 
Lawn Tennl ncluding ra 

balls, | iket presses anil covers, 

bandk raps, kw roj 

tennis e 

No. 707C Coif Catalogue 

EM "f 

Golf .. . ron clubs, aluminum clubs, rubber cored golf 

hole rims and cuttei 
4f and golf< 
No. 707L Catalouue of Lawn Games 

Crh 

Spalding complete line of 

I 

t the world. 
No 707U Catalogue of Uniform Goods 

■ .. descriptions and pi ding complete line of 

Unifoi 
Ball, Running. I ^ u][] At; 

buill especially fl 

d 

e furnl ih 

■ 

Copies of any of the* above catalogues will be mailed 
upon application, from any of our stores, addresses 
of which are on inside of front cover 



The 

Spalding 
Official 
League 
Ball 




Used exclu- 
sively by the 
Nati onal 
League, 
Minor Lea- 
gues, and by 
all Intercolle- 
giate and other 
Associations 
for over 
quarter of a 
century. Each 
ball wrapped 
in tinfoil and 

put in a separate box, and sealed in accordance with the regula- 
tions of the National League and American Association. \\ ST- 
ranted to last a full game when used under ordinary conditions. 



No. 1. 



Each, $1.25 



THE SPALDING OFFICIAL 
LEAGUE BALL FOR BOYS 



Made wilh I 
hide cover, and in 
' t same 

as our Official League Bali, lightly smaller in 

Especially designed for junior chiba (composed of boyi under 
16 years of age), and all games in which this ball is u-< d will 
be recognized as legal games. Warranted to last a full game. 



No IB. 



Each, 75c. 



A. C. SPALDING A, BROS. 

■ 
alt Athu i 



iMHi 



m 



SPALDING 
OFFICIAL LEAGUE BALL 



Is the Standard of the World 

It is the Original League Bail It is the Universally Adopted League B*P ' 

It U the Official League Ball It is the Best League Ball 

It has bit-n formally adoptal as the Official Ball of 

THE NATIONAL LEAGUE FOR 30 YEARS 

It has also Imn adopted as the Official Ball for all Championship 
;.y tbt following Professional Leagues . 

INTER-STATE LEAGUE for 9 yean, 
NEW YORK STATE LEAGUE for 11 year* 

,UE for 5 years 
SOUTH ATlJVNTIC LEAGUE for 5 years 
ILLINOIS and IOWA 

LEAGUE for 7 years 
And by tt other /'■ km Mat A air adopted tht Sliding League Bail from 1 to t years. 

THE Spalding League Ball was first adop-. •• in 1878. and is 

the only ball thtl ■■' time. 

In th- ■' the 

Chicago National and the Chicago A '; aiding League Ball was used. 



EASTERN LEACU1 

ROLAND LEAGUE to 20 years 
NORTHERN LEAGUE for 5 years 
TEXAS LEAGUE for 13 years 
WESTERN ASSOCIATION for 11 years 
ORNIA LEAGUE ft* 10 years 



IN addition to the different America! 

Cuba, Cai 

*r.d, ii iUvse Ball Is p!.i 

this ur.. 

high <;•■ . 

to secure abs<<! ■ 

■ink now r, 



, the'Spaldi .?ie Ball 

r BtM Ball AaaBciation of Urxioo, 

r uniformity and 

,,■.!! contests po.- 



at the same time make Um 

ID only be secured by standardizing one well known ball. 



The Spalding Official League Ball 



•1 irv.ird, 
IVit.- • , ncnt 

' .» short time with some otht-r ball, but 
m variably • 

i"* tt '. Ba V The Standard of the World 

become univeraally recognized . 

cr 

— i \ 






A. C. SPALDING A BROS. 

all Athlrtic Spt 



i Mill sis- 




bo 

e 

• M 



J.= : all" 



■a 

If] iipi 



2i!:**!ff!i 



P3I4I eg 





THE SPALDING "SCOOP" MITT 

(Patented May 8. 1906) U. S. Pat. Off.) 




ing od poinl 

•I with Hi- ; mitt 

■ stiffened 
with sole leather, giving full protection to the i 
of the fingers, and Ein1 of tbj mem 

of Hi. ury to thumb, 

combinal ood qualities which h po 

111 undoubtedly prove attractive to ! ' 
whodesir< 

RIGHTS AND LEFTS 
■* Scoop 1 



N 



MADE IN 
S. 



n, $10.00 



A. C. SPALDINC A BROS. 

■ 






Spalding 
Sun Protecting Mask 




THIS mask is used by practically all 
catchers on league, college and semi- 
professional teams. The patent sun- 
shade protects the eyes without obstructing 
the view. Mask is made throughout of 
finest steel wire, extra heavy black finish. . 
Fitted with molded leather chin strap, hair / 
(filled pads and special elastic head band. 

No 



4-0. 



Each, $4.00 



A. C. SPALDING A BROS. 

all A iiiii ' • thii >>" 



Special Catalogue, showing all colon and qualities, will be 
nailed on application to any team, togrtln-r with measurement 
blank and full instructions for measuring players for uniforms. 



The Spalding 
Uniform No. 

(Highest Grade Made) 

Workmanship and mate- 
rial in this uniform is of 
the very highest quality 
throughout. Used exclu- 
sively by all league and 
professional clubs for years 
past is sufficient evidence 
of its quality and durability 

COLORS 

Red Stripe, Green Stripe 
Navy Blue Check, White 
Pearl Gray, Yale Gray 
Light Gray, Black, Green 
Maroon, N avy Blue, 
Brown and Cardinal 

THE SPALDING 
Uniform No. 0. 

Complete, $15.00 
efatfrg ordi i 
• '/". am. 4p -% ry e/"\ 
a)lZ,OU 
Spalding Shirt, b 

. i * > l«\ 

Spalding » Sap, an 
SpaldingWeb Belt, leather lined 
SpaJdfa 

'. ith 
pair : 
with order for em 
25c. per pair. 



No Extra Charge for 

lettering shirts with name 
of club nor for detach- 
able sleeves. 



The 
University 
Uniform No. 1 

In workmanship and 
quality of material our 
University Uniform No. 1 
is equal to our No. 
Uniform,but slightly lighter 

COLORS 
Same as No. O Uniform 

THE UNIVERSITY 

Uniform No. I. 

Complete, $12.50 

nb§ ordi rt in/ for 

(PiA f\i\ 
$ 1 u.UU 

tyle. 
tyle. 
Beit, or all 

leatf 

oga, Ni». l u. 
No. 1 i 

l'Utll. 

i 



A. C. SPALDING & BROS. 

nil AthL i 




Spalding 
Sprinting 
Base Ball 
Shoe 



No, 30-S Ma. 

kangaroo 

leather and built on 
famous? running 
shot last. This &] 
strongly made, and 
while extremely lifrht 
iri weight, will be found 
substantial in c o n- 
No 30-S stru< 'ti<»n Hand 

and a strictly bench 
ihoe. 
Per pair. $7.00 



-G=3- 




N 0.2-0 



Spalding 
Highest 
Quality 
Base 
Ball 
Shoe 



No. 2-0. Hand made 
throughout and of spe- 
cially selected kansra- 
roo leather. No i 
Of exp 

spared In making 
shoe not only i h€ very 
1 in qualit 
ct in every other 
detail. The plate 
of the finest hand- 
forged razor steel and 
i mly riveted to 
heel and sole. 

Per pair, $7.00 



Spalding 
"Featherweight 
Base Ball 
Shoe 



The Lightest 
Base Ball 
Shoe ever 
\ made 




No FW 



No. FW. Owing to 
the lightness and fine- 
ness > 
tion it is suitah; 

of th«- 

not intended for 

• or for the 

ordinary player. Hand 

rJcrl ly 

bench • 

| ■.! 

5 
6 

7 - 
8 
9 - 

pair. $7.00 



A. C. SPALDING & BROS 













■PPBI 






Durand-Steel Lockers 



WOODEN LOCKKRS are ol 
tamable because they attract 
vermin, absorb odors, can be 
ily broken into, and are dan- 
. ion account of fire. Lockers made 
from wire mesh or expanded metal af- 
ford little security, as they can be easily 
entered with wire cutters. Clo 

d in them become covered w i tli 1 1 ust 
and t he lockers themselves presenta poor 
appearanee, resembling animal cages. 

Durand-Steel Lockers are made 

of high-grade steel plates, and are fin- 
ish. <1 with gloss-black Furnace baked 
Japan (400°), comparable to that used on 
hospital ware, which will never flake off 
nor require refinishing, as do paints and 
enamels. 

Durand-Steel Lockers are usual- 
ly built withdooi 

in i> inel uesign, v. • 





Six Lockers in 
Double Tier 



r>Tb* 



Dd backs 
sol id . 
This 
p r e - 

v» i nts 

i n one 
locker 
from 

romJPg in contact with wet gar- 
in adjoining lockers, while 
plenty of ventilation is secured by 
having the door perforated its 
entire length, but if the pur- 
chase e perforate the 
backs ■ 
The cost of Durand-Steel Lockers 

more than that of firs' 
wooden lockers, and they last as 
long bs the building, ai • 

. . and in addition* are lire- 

1 1 r< N • t 

We are handling lockers u a 

rial OOntrad business, and ship- 
ment will In every ease be made 
direel from the factory in Chi- 

I f \<mi will let us knov. 

number of lockers, size, and ar- 
hall bs glad to 
tip through lenee^* 



A. G. SPALDING A, BROS. 

r Complete Cat 

a(! At hi- ; 



THE FOLLOWING INDEX FROM 
SPALDING'S LATEST CATALOGUES 
WILL GIVE AN IDEA OF THE 
^^ GREAT VARIETY OF ATHLETIC 
GOODS MANUFACTURED AND SOLD 
BY A. G. SPALDING & BROS. • : : : 



Abdom 
Archei 
Athletic Paraphernalia. 

■ 

Striking . . 
. Uniform ->i 

Balls, Bate f 7 

Balls. Basket .. 
Halls, Croquet .... 

Foot :„ 7, 

• :, 

H>.Us. PieM 
Balla, Indooi 

... 
....... 11 » 

Bull. 

.r 

: 

OS 

BHt« •' 

ftrfkli 



1 1 5 

lis 






► 110, 111 



itiian Polo 
Fencing 



120 
120 



Field 



Foul Flagi 

iil. 



14 
I] 

! 



::l 
7 1 

<;-»ir i 



Golf g, 

Flaxnme 

. . .MS. 
1 1 1 1 r« 1 1 . 

II 



rji 



Inflate!*, Sfrlkn.. 

I 















qpjNMP 



. . M • . 



SPALDING'S ILLUSTRATED CATA- 
LOGUE AND PRICE LIST FURNLS! IED 
FREE UPON APPLICATION TO ANY 
OF SPALDING'S STORES-FOR LOCA- 
TION OF WHICH SEE INSIDE FRONT 
COVER OF THIS BOOK: :::::: 



Paint, Golf 

Ball 



Ball 

Kiimiliig 

■ 

I Shoe 
. I lome 

Plates, I'll. hers 

i Vault 

Polo, Boll* 

I \>\u for S )i <> •' 

Spik-s 

Protector, Thuml 
Ball 

If 



i 
H 



for s ii o e 



.... 



110 
20 

7."p 



19 



91 



77 

■ 






<;> mmtsfuin 

or Jumping. 
Jumping 
Indoor Running. 

Uu lining 



Shot 

i 

skull Capi 



: in thing 

. 

Supporter*, Ankli 
Knanei 

■ 

ouf- 
lng • 

, 
I'mpi 

■ 






41 

I 2 

so 

90, 91 

73 

81 

117 



■J I 



■ 






11 l 












JK. 



Jt^u&> 




Albert G. and J, Walter Spalding commenced business March 
i si, i.S/O. at ( Chicago, under the firm name A. < "i. Spalding & Bro., 
with a capital of $800. Two years later their brother-in-law, 
William T. Brown, came into the business, and the firm name 
was then changed to A. G. Spalding & Bros. 

The business was founded on the Athletic reputation of Mr. 
A. G. Spalding, who acquired a national prominence in the realm 
of Sport, as ( laptain and Pitcher 1 ford, 

111. (1865-70), die original Boston Base Ball Club (Champions of 
the United Statea, 1871 . the Chicago Ball Club I 187* 

first Champions of the National ! also one of the 

original organizers, and for many years a director, of the National 
League of America, the premier Base Ball organization of the 
world. Mr. Spaldi taken an important part in Base Ball 

affairs ever tti< <nal < rame 1 >! the United St 

at the close of the Civil War in 1 he returning Vetera 

that War, who had played the game as a camp diversion, 
seminated this new American field sport tl lit the country, 

and thus gave it its national char. 

Base Ball Goods were the only articles of merchandise carried 
the first year, the total lales amounting to $n.ooo. Gradually 
implements an Athletic Sports ded, until 

the firm now manufacture the requisit 

Spon inally the firm contracted for their supplies from 

le manufacturers, but finding it imp thod, 

to keep the standard of quality up to their high ideals, they 
gradually the manufacture ol their own goods, and 

the acquisition from time to time of various established 
factoi ted in different parts of the country 

•id do manufacture in their 1 iriag 

the Spa! which stands the world over as a 

guarantee of the highest quality. 



There are over three thousand persons employed in various 
capacities in A. G. Spalding & Bros.' factories and stor^£ located 
in all the leading cities of the United States, Canada and England. 
A capital of over $4,000,000 is employed in carrying on this busi- 
ness, and the annual sales exceed the total combined annual sales 
of all other manufacturers in the world making a similar line 
of goods. 

A. G. Spalding & Bros, have always taken a leading part in 
the introduction, encouragement and support of all new Sports 
and Games, and the prominence attained by Athletic Sports in 
the United States is in a very great measure due to the energy, 
enterprise and liberality of this progressive concern. They were 
the pioneers, and in fact the founders, of the Athletic Goods 
Trade in America, and are now universally recognized as the 
undisputed Leaders in the Athletic Goods line throughout the 
• !d. 

The late Marshall Field of Chicago, America's greatest Mer- 
chant, speaking of the business of A. G. Spalding & Bros., said : 
"I am familiar with its early career, growth and development, 
and when I compare its unpromising outlook and the special 
field for its operations that existed at its inception in 1876, with 
its present magnitude, I consider it one of the most remarkabb 
mercantile successes of the world." 

The millions of Athletes using them, and the thousands of 
Dealers selling them, attest to the High Quality of Spalding's 
Athletic Goods, and they must determine the future history of 
this concern. 







*~- <*Z *?r?r&^. 



n 



w^^ 



m 



i